U.S. Navy Destroyer Group (DESGRU) or Cruiser Destroyer Group (CRUDESGRU) and Carrier Strike Group (CSG), Carrier Battle Group and Amphibious Readiness Group are replaced by Carrier Strike Groups (CSG) and Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESGs)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

U.S. Navy Destroyer Group (DESGRU) or Cruiser Destroyer Group (CRUDESGRU) and Carrier Strike Group (CSG), Carrier Battle Group and Amphibious Readiness Group are replaced by Carrier Strike Groups (CSG) and Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESGs)

 

Royal Navy

 

Royal Navy destroyer units, amongst others, are listed in the list of squadrons and flotillas of the Royal Navy, sections on squadrons and flotillas of destroyers, frigates, and escorts.

 

US Navy

 

The US Navy acronym for a destroyer squadron is DESRON; it comprises three or more destroyers or frigates. It is not generally an operational unit, but is responsible for training, equipping and administering of its ships. A mixed unit including destroyers is the cruiser-destroyer group. The officer in command of DESRON SIX, for example, is designated Commander Destroyer Squadron Six, COMDESRON SIX for short.

 

DESRON is the USN abbreviation for Destroyer Squadron. A DESRON usually consists of three or more Destroyers or Frigates. A CRUDESRON is a Cruiser Destroyer Squadron and includes cruisers in the ships under its control. In the USN, a DESRON is not generally an operational unit but responsible for training, equipping and administering of the ships under its umbrella. The officer in command of DESRON SIX is designated COMDESRON SIX or Commander Destroyer Squadron Six.

 

Several DESRONs or CRUDESRONs may be organized into a Destroyer Group (DESGRU) or Cruiser Destroyer Group (CRUDESGRU). The overall responsibility for surface warships on the west coast of the USA is taken by the Commander Surface Force, Pacific Fleet (COMSURFPAC).

 

When deployed, a Cruiser-Destroyer Group Commander is normally assigned as the operational commander of a Carrier Battle Group (CVBG).

 

When a DESRON deploys, for instance as part of a Carrier Battle Group, overall command is transferred to the Naval Component Commander of the local Regional Command (eg. COMNAVCENT or Commander US Naval Forces, Central Command)” (Ref. 685 & 686).

 

“Effective Oct. 1, 1995 the U.S. Pacific Fleet's surface ships were to be reorganized into six core battle groups and eight destroyer squadrons. Permanent core battle groups were to include a battle group commander, aircraft carrier, carrier air wing and at least two cruisers. The following ship assignment changes will apply (shore command changes were listed in the July 18 issue of The Sun)” (Ref. 313G & 313Q):

 

List of Destroyer and Cruiser Destroyer Squadrons

 

U.S. Pacific and Atlantic Fleets

 

Cruiser Destroyer Squadrons

 

“From April 1, 1962, Cruiser-Destroyer forces in the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets were organized in Cruiser-Destroyer Flotillas (CRUDESFLOTs). These formations included Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla One in the Pacific (included Parks), Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Three at Long Beach in the Pacific (commanded for a time by Rear Admiral Draper Kauffman), Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Two in the Atlantic (included Yosemite), Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Four in the Atlantic, which supplied ships for the Task Force Alfa antisubmarine experiment and had USS Shenandoah (AD-26) as flagship for a time. Cornelius S. Snodgrass served as chief of staff for CRUDESFLOT 4 before his retirement in 1974” (Ref. 685A). Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Six in the Atlantic (flagship at one point USS Macdonough (DDG-39) and included Yellowstone). Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Six included Destroyer Squadron Four with USS Johnson in 1971, seemingly home-ported at the Charleston Naval Base. Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Seven was homeported at San Diego, commanded by Admiral Waldemar F. A. Wendt from April 1962, with concurrent duty as Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Force, Pacific, October-November 1961. CRUDESFLOT SEVEN was also commanded at one point by then Rear Admiral Elmo Zumwalt. In December 1969, Admiral Robert S. Salzer assumed command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 3. Salzar assumed command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 7 in September 1970, and after the disestablishment of that formation on 16 March 1971 returned to command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 3.

 

Other flotillas included Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Eight in the Atlantic, which at one point included Destroyer Squadron Twenty-Two (685B), Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Nine in the Pacific, Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Eleven in the Pacific (with DesDiv 152, DesRon 15?), and Cruiser-Destroyer Flotillas Ten and Twelve in the Atlantic.

 

On 30 June 1973 Cruiser-Destroyer Flotillas were redesignated Cruiser-Destroyer Groups (CRUDESGRUs). The overall responsibility for surface warships on the west coast of the USA is taken by the Commander, Naval Surface Forces Pacific (COMNAVSURFPAC); on the east coast, the same responsibility rests with the Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic (COMSURFLANT). Previously under this system, when deployed, a Cruiser-Destroyer Group Commander would normally have been assigned to command a Carrier Battle Group (CVBG). Cruiser-Destroyer Groups were superseded by Carrier strike groups from 1 October 2004.

 

When a destroyer squadron deploys, for instance as part of a Carrier Strike Group, overall command is transferred to the Naval Component Commander of the local Regional Command (e.g. COMNAVCENT or Commander US Naval Forces, Central Command).

 

U.S. Destroyer Squadrons

Squadrons

Pacific

Atlantic

Middle East

Destroyer Squadron 1

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 2

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 6

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 9

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 14

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 15

P (7th Flt.)

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 18

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 21

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 22

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 23

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 26

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 28

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 40

 

A (4th Flt.)

 

Destroyer Squadron 50

 

 

Middle East

Battle Force Fifth Fleet (CTF-50)

 

6

7

1

DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke Class Destroyers.

Destroyer Squadron 23 (Pacific) Destroyer Squadron 23 is a flotilla of United States Navy destroyers and frigates based out of San Diego, California”(Ref. 685S).

 

Formerly, as during World War II, a full-strength DesRon (as it was abbreviated at the time) comprised two Destroyer Divisions or DesDivs of four ships each, plus a squadron flagship; these were operational as well as administrative units” (Ref. 685 & 686).

 

List of US destroyer squadrons

 

· Destroyer Squadron 1 (Pacific Fleet) - The Squadron's combat mission is to support the Operational Commander (currently Carrier Strike Group One) in achieving optimum combat readiness for his ships and to ensure adherence to Type Commander requirements. The Commander of Destroyer Squadron One directs, oversees, and assists the ships of the squadron in achieving and maintaining the highest level of material, operational and personnel readiness. When required, COMDESRON-1 exercises command over ships assigned for naval operations in order to achieve sea and air control in pursuit of national objectives. He functions as Immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) for the squadron's ships and prepare them for sustained combat operations at sea” (Ref. 942). ISIC duties include: Preparing squadron ships for assignment to operational commanders as directed by the Commander, Naval Surface Forces Pacific Fleet and the Commander, U.S. Third Fleet. Maintaining ISIC responsibilities throughout the life cycle of the ship, regardless of location or operational control, except in circumstances where otherwise directed” (Ref. 685F).

· Destroyer Squadron 2 (Atlantic Fleet) - Is administratively part of Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic” (Ref. 685G). Following the end of World War I, the U.S. Navy possessed an unprecedented number of destroyers, increased dramatically with the war emergency program ships of the Wickes (Destroyer No. 75) and Clemson (Destroyer No.186) classes – known collectively as “flush-deckers” that differed from previous destroyer types that had been distinguished by raised forecastle decks. Destroyer Squadron Two first appeared in the U.S. Fleet organization in the spring of 1919, assigned to the Atlantic Fleet with Columbia (Cruiser No. 12) as its flagship. It comprised three destroyer flotillas, each composed of three six-ship divisions.  The U.S. Pacific Fleet organization of 1 August 1919 lists Destroyer Squadron Two as a reserve force, the squadron flag in Salem (Cruiser No. 3). It consisted of Flotilla Ten, comprising Division 29 (six ships), Division 30 (three ships), and Division 31 (six ships), and Flotilla Eleven, comprising six six-ship divisions (22, 23, 35, 32, 33 and 34), nine of the latter’s ships apparently under construction, with names not yet assigned, in that they are listed only by number; some did not have commanding officers ordered to them.. As of June 2010, DesRon 2 was composed of Arleigh Burke, Barry (DDG-52), Stout (DDG-55), Laboon (DDG-58), Gonzalez (DDG-66), Bulkeley (DDG-84), and Mason (DDG-87). ComDesRon 2 will deploy with the Enterprise Strike Group” (Ref. 685Z).

· Destroyer Squadron 3 - In late 1941, Destroyer Squadron 3, like Destroyer Squadron 5, was composed of one Porter-class flagship plus two four-ship divisions of Mahan-class 1,500-tonners: USS Clark (DD-361), flag; USS Cummings; USS Reid, and six more (685B). All except Downes commissioned in 1936” (Ref. 685B).

· Destroyer Squadron 6 (Atlantic) (Pascagoula, Miss., when part of Western Hemisphere Group; included Hall, Ticonderoga, and Yorktown c.1998) - In April 1994, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 6 changed homeport to Pascagoula, Mississippi and subsequently was dual hatted as Commander, Naval Surface Group Pascagoula. In January 1996, as a result of a reorganization of the United States Atlantic Fleet, Commander, Naval Surface Group Pascagoula was renamed Commander, Regional Support Group Pascagoula. In April of 1998, as the result of yet another reorganization, COMDESRON 6 shifted operational control to Commander, Western Hemisphere Group, and was redesignated as a Tactical Squadron. In December of 1999, COMDESRON 6 was redesignated as a Tactical/Readiness Squadron under the operational control of Commander, Naval Surface Group 2. The mission of COMDESRON SIX is to put combat ready ships to sea in support of Fleet operations. Destroyer Squadron Six is dedicated to support operations in the United States Southern Command's area of responsibility. COMDESRON SIX is the US Navy's Executive Agent for combating and countering narco-terrorism, and the development of tactics and procedures to assist in our nation's war on drugs. Destroyer Squadron 28 (Naval Reserve Force) was Commissioned in Newport, Rhode Island on 1 December 1971 and was comprised of ten Naval Reserve Force destroyers. It was redesignated Surface Squadron Two on 01 June 1980, when Regular Navy Ships began to return to Newport. On 24 November 1981, the Chief of Naval Operations established Commander, Naval Surface Group FOUR. The new command assimilated all elements of SURFRON TWO, the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activities, and Atlantic Fleet Engineering Training Scholarship at Newport. By the late 1980s Naval Surface Group Four in Newport, Rhode Island consisted of 14-17 ships and three shore based activities. In February 1993, Commander, Naval Surface Group FOUR was redesignated as Commander, Destroyer Squadron SIX. The squadron consisted of seven Naval Reserve Force ships in three homeports: Norfolk, VA; Mayport, FL; and Pensacola, FL. In April 1994, Commander, Destroyer Squadron SIX changed homeport to Pascagoula, Mississippi and subsequently was dual hatted as Commander, Naval Surface Group Pascagoula. In January 1996, as a result of Atlantic Fleet Reorganization, Commander, Naval Surface Group Pascagoula was renamed Commander, Regional Support Group Pascagoula. In April of 1998, as the result of another Atlantic Fleet Reorganization, COMDESRON SIX shifted operational control to Commander, Western Hemisphere Group, and was redesignated as a Tactical Squadron. In December of 1999, COMDESRON SIX was redesignated as a Tactical/Readiness Squadron under the operational control of Commander, Naval Surface Group TWO. Destroyer Squadron Six is the Navy's executive agent for Counter Narco Terrorism and is focused on operations and exercises within the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. Where CDS 6 reservist once focused on the maintenance of squadron ships, the new mission dictates that the manning and training be focused on the new mission. CDS-6 reservists are now fully focused on providing operational support to exercises and operations in SOUTHCOM AOR to include the augmentation of the DESRON SIX, COMUSNAVSO, and various multi-national staffs” (Ref. 685C). At one point, the composition of Destroyer Squadron 6 included FFG-16 at Mayport, FFG 22 at Charleston, SC, USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13) at Charleston, SC, FFG 15 at Norfolk, and FFG 20 and FFG 21 at Pascagoula.

· Destroyer Squadron 7 - DESRON 7 operated in the Atlantic and Pacific during World War Two, and it subsequently saw service in the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the 1990–91 Persian Gulf War. The squadron is administratively responsible to Commander, Naval Surface Forces Pacific, and it was operationally part of Carrier Strike Group Seven until the group was disestablished on 30 December 2011 (685I)” (Ref. 685H).

· Destroyer Squadron 9 (Pacific) Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE directs, oversees and assists its Squadron Ships in achieving and maintaining the highest levels of material, operational and personnel readiness for the conduct of sustained naval operations; develops and formalizes doctrine, operational procedures, tactics and associated training requirements; and serves as the Sea Combat Commander and Maritime Interdiction Operations Commander within the assigned Carrier Task Group within THIRD, FIFTH and SEVENTH Fleets. The Squadron also performs the duties of Submarine Operating Coordination Authority and Helicopter Element Coordinator within a Carrier Task Group. Destroyer Squadron NINE was first formed in 1920. Homeported in Charleston, South Carolina, the Squadron consisted of 18 World War I "Four Pipers". In July 1921 the Squadron moved to Newport, Rhode Island where it operated until it was disestablished in May 1930. Destroyer Squadron NINE was reestablished in 1937 in the Pacific Fleet. In November 1942 the Squadron was homeported in Recife, Brazil where the Commodore was also assigned Station Commander. Destroyer Squadron NINE's mission was submarine hunting and patrol and escort duty, occasionally interspersed with brief flurries of action against German U-Boats. The squadron continued operations out of Recife until August 1944, at which time the Squadron was dissolved for a second time and its ships reassigned. Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE deployed June 2000 to conduct the bilateral series of exercises called Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT). Embarked in USS GERMANTOWN (LSD-42), the Staff served as Officer in Tactical Command of a five-ship Task Group conducting exercises with the armed forces of the Republic of the Philippines, Thailand, Brunei, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. Involving more than 1,800 U.S. military forces, the CARAT Task Group was headed by Commodore Joseph J. Natale, Commander, Destroyer Squadron Nine, homeported at Naval Station Everett, Wash. The Desron Nine staff embarked USS Germantown (LSD-42), forward-deployed to Sasebo, Japan, for the duration of the exercise. Other ships in the task group include USS Mount Vernon (LSD-39) and USS Sides (FFG-14), both homeported in San Diego; USS Reuben James (FFG-57), homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; and USS Safeguard (ARS-50), forward-deployed to Sasebo, Japan. USS Columbus (SSN-762), homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and USS Helena (SSN-725), homeported in San Diego, also joined the task group in individual phases” (Ref. 685J).

· Destroyer Squadron 11 - The Honda Point Disaster was the largest peacetime loss of U.S. Navy ships. On the evening of September 8, 1923, seven destroyers of DESRON 11, while traveling at 20 knots (37 km/h), ran aground at Honda Point, a few miles from the northern side of the Santa Barbara Channel off Point Arguello on the coast in Santa Barbara County, California. Two other ships grounded, but were able to maneuver free of the rocks. Twenty-three sailors died in the disaster” (Ref. 685K).

· Destroyer Squadron 14 (Atlantic) - History can be traced back to November 1920, when it began as a reserve organization in Philadelphia, PA. The squadron's last Commodore before being disestablished in 1931 was the future Fleet Admiral William F. ("Bull") Halsey. Upon completion of Post-Deployment Maintenance periods and Unit Level Training, CDS 14 provides surge ready assets to conduct independent and ESG/CSG deployments to SECONDFLT, THIRDFLT, FIFTHFLT and SIXTHFLT areas of responsibility in support of global naval presence, counter drug operations, and homeland defense. As an Immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) of 15 warships, CDS 14 oversees the tactical proficiency, administrative support, and material readiness of these ships in order to ensure they are ready to deploy to the Mediterranean Sea, Caribbean, Persian Gulf, and other oceans of the world. In addition to serving as ISIC for these 15 ships, CDS 14  serves as USFLTFORCOM Coordinating Authority for Anti-Terrorism and Force Protection” (Ref. 685M).

· Destroyer Squadron 15 (Pacific) - FIFTEEN was re-designated Destroyer Squadron FIVE in 1931. Following the declaration of war in 1941, Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN was again commissioned and fought in the battles for North Africa and Sicily. Additionally, the squadron participated in 19 round-trip convoy crossings of the Atlantic during the war. In 1945, the squadron converted to Destroyer Minesweepers (DMS), and was re-designated MINERON 21. Reactivated in 1946 for service with the Pacific Fleet through 1949, the squadron was briefly disestablished during 1950. However, the squadron was again commissioned for service late in the same year following the outbreak of the Korean War and continues in commission today. DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke Class Destroyers. The Destroyer Squadron Commodore serves as the Immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) of the ships assigned to the squadron. DESRON FIFTEEN ships are the principal surface forces of Battle Force Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. In addition to duties as ISIC for the seven ships assigned to the squadron, the DESRON FIFTEEN staff also deploys with the George Washington Carrier Strike Group (CSG). During these deployments, the Commodore serves as Sea Combat Commander (SCC) for the CSG. The SCC responsibilities include Surface Warfare Commander (SUWC), Anti Submarine Warfare Commander (ASWC), Maritime Intercept Operations Coordinator (MIO), Mine Warfare Coordinator (MIW), and Submarine Operational Controlling Authority (SOCA) (responsible for coordinating employment of attack submarines assigned to the CSG). DESRON FIFTEEN has additional assignments in the Seventh Fleet as the Maritime Counter - Special Operations Force Commander (MCSOF), Strike Force ASW Commander (SFASWC) and Deputy Ballistic Missile Defense Commander (BMDC)” (Ref. 685N).

· Destroyer Squadron 17 was flagship USS Coontz (DDG-40) in 1962. On 1 April 1971, Mason became a unit of Destroyer Squadron 17. During the first week of July 1971” (Ref. 685P). With Cruiser-Destroyer Group Five in the 1990s operating in the Pacific” (Ref. 685O). No record of current activity on the internet. Most likely deactivated.

· Destroyer Squadron 18 (Pacific) - DESRON 18 was reestablished on September 1, 1995, having been previously disestablished in 1973. Commander, Destroyer Squadron 18 was assigned to the USS Enterprise Battle Group and served as Commander Task Force 60/Battle Force Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea and Adriatic SeaUSS Ammen (DD-527) joined the squadron in the spring of 1952 in the Atlantic after reconditioning. COMDESRON EIGHTEEN was reactivated on January 28, 1962 with Captain Isaac C. Kidd, Jr. in command. USS Sampson (DDG-10) joined Destroyer Squadron 18 and Destroyer Division 182 (DesDiv 182) in July 1962. Destroyer Squadron EIGHTEEN, consisted of USS NICHOLSON (DD 982), USS THORN (DD 988), USS COMTE DE GRASSE (DD 974), and USS NICHOLAS (FFG 47), on September 1, 1995 following a reorganization of the Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. Since then, the ships of Destroyer Squadron EIGHTEEN have participated in numerous NATO and bilateral exercises. In addition, COMDESRON EIGHTEEN deployed to the Arabian Gulf as part of the GEORGE WASHINGTON Battle Group. On September 1, 1996, USS STOUT (DDG 55) joined the squadron and USS COMTE DE GRASSE (DD 974) left the squadron and joined the Western Hemisphere Group. . April 2000 showed the departure of USS Klakring (FFG 42) transferred to Destroyer Squadron Fourteen in Mayport FL. But another warship USS McFaul (DDG 74) came soon after. Destroyer Squadron 18 was first established May 28, 1943, when Commander William K. Mendenhall, Jr. broke his pennant in USS FRANKFORD (DD 497) at the Destroyer Base in San Diego, California. The squadron was composed of nine ships. Destroyer Squadron 18 shifted to the east coast via the Panama Canal and commenced convoy escort duties between the United States and Europe” (Ref. 685D).

· Destroyer Squadron 21 (Pacific) - Organized March 1, 1943 as a squadron, the officers and crew rapidly developed an 'sprit de corps' knowing that they had been and were going to continue leading the new 2100-ton Fletcher class destroyers into surface engagements. In October 1943, the squadron was ordered north to the Central Pacific to join the fast carrier task forces in the Gilbert and Marshall Islands campaigns with a future leading role in the victorious entrance into Tokyo Bay for the Japanese surrender. Through these years at war, the ships of Squadron Twenty-One left a "legacy of courage and fighting skill." This inspiration combined with a description of the formation and early World War II history of the squadron resulted in the present squadron insignia: a Rampant Lion with a trident, sweeping the seas beneath the Southern Cross and the motto "Solomons Onward." Destroyer Squadron Twenty-One's proud history began in March, 1943, when the first ships of the then-new Fletcher class, having been deployed to Guadalcanal in the southwestern Pacific's Solomon Islands, were organized as Destroyer Squadron Twenty One, part of Admiral William F. Halsey's Third Fleet. Today, the Squadron is continuously active with the John C. Stennis Strike Group. The Rampant Lions of Destroyer Squadron Twenty-One are proud of their heritage and of their vital, current, and future roles in support of our nation's worldwide maritime interests and responsibilities” (Ref. 685Q).

· Destroyer Squadron 22 (685B) (Atlantic) and for World War II see (685C) 2010 composition included USS Truxtun (DDG-103), USS Nitze (DDG-94), USS Mason (DDG-87), USS McFaul (DDG-74), USS Mahan (DDG-72), USS Cole (DDG-67), and USS Elrod (FFG-55). Destroyer Squadron TWENTY TWO was formed at the outbreak of the Korean conflict and conducted its first deployment to the Mediterranean in 1951-1952. From September 1953 to March 1954, the Squadron sailed over 44,000 miles completing an around-the-world operational cruise. Throughout the 1950’s, 1960’s and early 1970’s, Destroyer Squadron TWENTY TWO operated in the Mediterranean, Atlantic, Caribbean, the Great Lakes, and the Pacific, including participation in the Cuban Blockade and action on the gun line during the Vietnam Conflict. CDS 22 and DESRON 22 ships are currently inport Norfolk, Virginia conducting post deployment leave and upkeep. COMDESRON 22 is the Immediate Superior in Command of six ships including: five ARLEIGH BURKE Class Guided Missile Destroyers, and one OLIVER HAZARD PERRY Class Guided Missile Frigate” (Ref. 685R).

· Destroyer Squadron 23 (Pacific) - Destroyer Squadron 23 was activated May 11, 1943 at the Boston Navy Yard, with Captain M.J. Gilliam in command. The original vessels of the squadron were USS Foote (DD-511), USS Charles Ausburne (DD-570), USS Spence (DD-512), USS Aulick (DD-569), USS Claxton (DD-571), USS Dyson (DD-572), USS Converse (DD-509) and USS Thatcher (DD-514). On June 29, 1943, Destroyer Squadron 23 became part of Admiral William F. Halsey's Third Fleet. Less USS Aulick, Destroyer Squadron 23 assumed duty on patrol and escort in the Southwest Pacific. Destroyer Squadron 23 earned its reputation—and a Presidential Unit Citation—under its second commodore, Captain Arleigh Burke, who assumed command on October 23, 1943. On November 24, 1943, during the Battle of Cape St. George, the squadron engaged six enemy destroyers. In what has been described by tacticians as "near perfect surface actions", the squadron sank four enemy destroyers, and damaged two, one badly, without injury to themselves. In the period November 1943- February 1944, the Little Beavers fought in 22 separate engagements and were credited with destroying one Japanese cruiser, nine destroyers, one submarine, several smaller ships, and approximately 30 aircraft. Destroyer Squadron 23's operations in the Pacific continued through the Liberation of the Philippines. The squadron returned to the United States on October 19, 1945 and were presented the Presidential Unit Citation by Admiral Burke and Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal. In February 1946, the squadron was inactivated and the ships were sent to Charleston, South Carolina for lay-up. On April 4, 1956, the squadron was reactivated as Destroyer Division 231 under the command of Captain E. K. Wakefield, with USS Picking (DD-685), USS Stephen Potter (DD-538), USS Preston (DD-795), and USS Irwin (DD-794). The squadron was rededicated as the "Little Beavers" on December 12, 1956 by Rear Admiral Chester Wood, Commander Cruiser Destroyer Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet in ceremonies at Long Beach, California.USS McClusky (FFG-41) was part of the squadron in 1986. Destroyer Squadron 23 is a flotilla of United States Navy destroyers and frigates based out of San Diego, California”(Ref. 685S).

· Destroyer Squadron 24 - disestablished effective 30 September 2011, IAW Directive 5400.7475 (11) OPNAV DISESTABLISHMENT OF COMMANDER, DESTROYER SQUADRON TWO FOUR, dated 4/4/2011. Destroyer Squadron 24, formerly Escort Destroyer Squadron 6, was established on July 1, 1956, and homeported in Newport, R.I. Know as the "Keystone" squadron, the name carried over from the original formation of Escort Squadron 6 when the Commodore and all commanding officers hailed from the state of Pennsylvania, the Keystone state. Destroyer Squadron 24 shifted homeports in 1973 from Newport, R.I. to Mayport. In 1978, Destroyer Squadron 24 was redesignated a tactical squadron commander whose purpose is to command assigned ships for naval air and sea control in pursuit of national objectives. Squadron mission emphasis is specifically on tactical development and execution. When deployed, Destroyer Squadron 24 is usually assigned anti-submarine warfare and/or anti-surface warfare commander duties within the battle group or in a specific area of operation. Leading anywhere from only a few to greater than a dozen ships, the squadron can effectively execute a variety of missions ranging from Tomahawk strike planning and execution and open-ocean warfare to maritime interdiction operations and littoral warfare in support of joint forces ashore. In home port, the staff supports training and readiness needs of assigned ships. Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR, formerly Escort Destroyer Squadron SIX, was established 1 July 1956 and homeported in Newport, Rhode Island. The "KEYSTONE" Squadron name carried over from the original formation of Escort Destroyer Squadron SIX when the Commodore and all Commanding Officers hailed from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania - the KEYSTONE State. The squadron is administratively and operationally assigned to Commander, Carrier Group SIX. During the 1960s. Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR participated in several historic events. In January and February 1962, squadron ships participated in the Project Mercury Space Task Recovery Group in support of Lieutenant Colonel John Glenn's milestone first manned orbital flight. Later that year, four squadron ships joined other U.S. Atlantic Fleet ships off the waters of Cuba in support of the Cuban Quarantine. Highlights of that operation included boarding clearance of five Soviet merchant ships and, in conjunction with the 3rd Antisubmarine Carrier Group, surfacing a Soviet submarine. In September 1965, Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR was the first U.S. Atlantic Fleet destroyer squadron deployed to the Pacific Fleet in support of combat operations in Southeast Asia. In 1973 Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR shifted homeport from Newport, Rhode Island, to Mayport, Florida. In 1978 Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR was designated a tactical destroyer squadron with a mission to command, train and prepare ships for naval operations in support of the National Maritime Strategy. From then and through the decade of the Eighties, Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR conducted Battle Group operations in the North Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, Caribbean Sea, Indian Ocean and South America. The squadron has participated in naval contingency operations in Beirut, Lebanon; rescue operations in Grenada; anti-terrorist strikes into Libya and freedom of navigation operations in the Black Sea and Gulf of Sidra. Noted for its development and evaluation of surface antisubmarine warfare tactics, in 1986 Destroyer Squadron TWO FOUR produced the training plan used to prepare all Atlantic Fleet towed array ships for extended deployment” (Ref. 685T).

· Destroyer Squadron 25 – WW II in the Pacific. No active foot print on the internet” (Ref. 685U).

· Destroyer Squadron 26 (Atlantic) - In September of 1995 as a result of the reorganization of Surface Forces Atlantic, destroyer squadrons now became permanent Immediate Superior In Command (ISIC) to all destroyers and frigates. This reorganization replaced all tactical destroyer squadrons and readiness squadrons and combined the duties and responsibilities of the two into the new destroyer squadron. Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-SIX oversees the combat readiness of its five ships, USS MAHAN (DDG 72), USS LABOON (DDG 58), USS BARRY (DDG 52), USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD (DD 968), and USS KAUFFMAN (FFG 59). This Squadron continues to play a significant role in fleet and joint operations. The mission of Destroyer Squadron Twenty Six (DESRON 26) is to conduct underway operations and exercise tactical control of destroyers, frigates, submarines, and aircraft during peace and war time operations. When deployed as part of an Aircraft Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Commander, Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-SIX serves as a Major Warfare Commander, planning operations and tasking Battle Group assets. Typical assignments are as Alternate Composite Warfare Commander (CWC) and Sea Combat Commander (SCC). The SCC is responsible for performing numerous roles in the Battle Group, including Anti-Submarine Warfare Commander, Surface Warfare Commander, Submarine Operations Coordinating Authority, TOMAHAWK Launch Area Coordinator, Maritime Intercepts Operations (MIO) Commander, and Screen Coordinator. During Underway operations separate from the Aircraft Carrier, the Commander, Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-SIX may serve as a Joint or Naval Task Group Commander. The Commander, Destroyer Squadron TWENTY SIX reports administratively to the Commander, Naval Surface Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMNAVSURFLANT), whether deployed or in homeport (Norfolk, VA). Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-SIX reports operationally to Commander Cruiser-Destroyer Group EIGHT. In April 1978, Atlantic Fleet Destroyer Squadrons were reorganized and Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-SIX was designated a tactical squadron, responsible for the "at-sea" training and operations of Atlantic Fleet destroyers and frigates during exercises and deployments, while administrative responsibilities were assigned to readiness squadrons who remained in homeport. In July 1996 DESRON 26, deployed with the USS George Washington Battle Group, completed highly successful Black Sea operations and made port visits to Varna, Bulgaria; Constanta, Romania; and Odesa, Ukraine. By the end of deployment, DESRON 26 ships participated in 13 major exercises. DESRON 26 crew members participated in community relations projects such as painting, electrical and mechanical repairs and lawn work. When visiting high school students, Sailors shared stories about growing up in America” (Ref. 685W). At one point (2005) comprised USS Barry (DDG-52), USS Mahan (DDG-72), USS Mason (DDG-87), and USS Kauffman (FFG-59)” (Ref. 685V). The missions of the Destroyer Squadron TWO SIX (DESRON 26) is to conduct underway operations and exercise tactical control of destroyers, frigates, submarines, and aircraft during peace and war time operations. When deployed as part of a Carrier Strike Group (CSG), Commander, DESRON 26 serves as a major Warfare Commander, planning operations and commanding Strike Group assets. Typical assignments are Alternate Composite Warfare Commander (CWC) and Sea Combat Commander (SCC). The SCC is responsible for performing numerous roles within the Strike Group, including Undersea Warfare Commander, Surface Warfare Commander, Submarine Operations Coordinating Authority, Maritime Interception Operations Commander and Screen Coordinator. During underway operations separate from the Carrier, the Commander, DESRON 26 may serve as a Joint or naval Task Group Commander. Squadron duties also include the stewardship and oversight of training, material readiness, maintenance, and the personnel of the assigned ships. Whether deployed or in homeport (Norfolk, VA), DESRON 26 reports administratively and operationally to Commander Carrier Strike Group Ten” (Ref. ” (Ref. 685V).

· Destroyer Squadron 28 (Atlantic) – DESRON 28 was first established on 15 August 1951. Although located in San Diego, the squadron was a component of the Atlantic Fleet. DESRON 28 originally consisted of eight general purpose rescue destroyers whose missions included anti-submarine warfare, shore bombardment, air defense and routine training. DESRON 28 operated until 1954 when the ships were reassigned and the squadron was disestablished. DESRON 28 was re-established on 1 September 1995, during the most recent reorganization of the Atlantic Fleet surface force. The mission of DESRON 28 is to provide a fully trained, combat ready force of surface combatants to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Administratively, COMDESRON 28 reports directly to Commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; operationally, COMDESRON 28 reports to the Commander, Second Fleet through a designated Strike Group Commander” (Ref. 685X).

· Destroyer Squadron 31 (Pacific) - DESTROYER SQUADRON 31 first appeared in the Organization List of the United States Navy in September 1939.  During World War II, COMDESRON 31 ships saw duty as members of the Northeastern Escort Force in Atlantic Fleet convoy escort operations.  One squadron ship, USS TRUXTIN (DD 229) was credited with the first sighting of an enemy submarine in the “Short-of-War” period just prior to World War II.  On 31 October 1941, another squadron ship, USS REUBEN JAMES (DDG 245) became the first U.S. warship lost to enemy action during World War II when she was torpedoed by a German U-Boat while on convoy escort operations. Disestablished in San Diego, California following World War II, COMDESRON 31 remained inactive until 01 February 1968, when the squadron was reactivated as a unit of the Seventh Fleet operating in waters off Southeast Asia.  Deactivated again in early 1970, the squadron was reactivated for a second time on 15 June 1971 and has remained on continuous active duty since then. On 01 September 1985, COMDESRON 31 was designated as the Pacific Fleet Ant-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Squadron and was tasked with enhancing inoperability between U.S. and allied forces.  It served as the core for ASW training and has fostered ASW tactical development.  While no longer acting as the Pacific Fleet ASW squadron, COMDESRON 31 remains the ASW Surface Component Commander for Commander, ASW Forces Pacific, and is the Fleet Project Team Leader for the Computer Aided Dead Reckoning Tracer (CADRT) Program.  COMDESRON 31 shifted homeport to its current location in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1991. COMDESRON 31 is the immediate superior in command (ISIC) for the USS RUSSELL (DDG 59), USS PAUL HAMILTON (DDG 60), USS HOPPER (DDG 70), USS O’KANE (DDG 77), USS CHAFEE (DDG 90), USS CHUNG-HOON (DDG 93), USS CROMMELIN (FFG 37) and USS REUBEN JAMES (FFG 57).  As ISIC, COMDESRON 31 is responsible for the direct oversight of the training, maintenance and readiness of these eight surface combatants” (Ref. 685Y).

· Destroyer Squadron 36 - DESRON 36 was first established 1 July 1956.  The squadron was primarily organized for antisubmarine warfare, being composed of six escort destroyers (Gearing class DDEs). The first overseas deployment of the squadron was a North Atlantic cruise originally scheduled to consist of ASW exercises with NATO countries in the North Atlantic. The North Atlantic cruise was interrupted when the squadron was ordered to the Mediterranean to augment the U.S. SIXTH Fleet during the November 1956 Suez crisis. Destroyer Squadron THIRTY-SIX was the Senior Officer Present Afloat during the early phases of the Lebanon crisis, providing support for the amphibious operation. http://dangrusdav.tripod.com/command.htm). No active front print on the internet. Decommissioned most likely.

· Destroyer Squadron 40 (Fourth Fleet) (Atlantic) – U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO) has increased its flexibility and operational strength with the addition of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 40 to its assigned units. Formerly known as Destroyer Squadron 6 and based in Pascagoula, Miss., DESRON 40 has relocated to Mayport. The squadrons new command structure better reflects its mission as the tactical destroyer squadron for NAVSO” (Ref. 686A).

· Destroyer Squadron FIFTY (DESRON 50)
COMDESRON FIFTY
Destroyer Squadron Fifty
DESRON FIFTY
DESRON 50
Battle Force Fifth Fleet (CTF-50)
Commander Middle East Force                                                                                   

 

COMNAVCENT [Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command]
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil

Focus on Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet
http://www.news.navy.mil/local/cusnc

Video News from the Fleet
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/videos/index.html

 

Carrier Strike Group (CSG)

Carrier Battle Group and Amphibious Readiness Group are replaced by Carrier Strike Groups (CSG) and Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESGs)

 

 “In the CNO Guidance for 2003, Admiral Vernon Clark stipulated that the terms Carrier Battle Group and Amphibious Readiness Group would be replaced by Carrier Strike Groups (CSG) and Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESGs), respectively, by March 2003. Cruiser-Destroyer (CRUDESGRU) and Carrier Groups (CARGRU) were also redesignated, as Carrier Strike Groups (CSG), and aligned directly under the numbered fleet commanders. CARGRU and CRUDESGRU staffs were formerly under the administrative authority of their respective air and surface type commanders (TYCOM). This realignment allowed key operational leaders authority and direct access to the personnel required to more effectively accomplish the Navy’s mission. All carrier strike groups are ultimately subordinate to Fleet Forces Command.

 

The numbered fleet commanders are now responsible for the training and certification of the entire Strike Group. The organizational structure to support the Carrier Strike Groups focuses more on placing Strike Group commanders under the authority of the certifying officer, or the numbered fleet commander. Under this new division of responsibility, the air-side type commander gains authority over the air wing, and the surface-side type commander gains authority over the carrier itself and the rest of the ships of the battle group” (Ref. 313B; 313B1 & 313B8).

 

“A carrier strike group (CSG) is an operational formation of the United States Navy. It is composed of roughly 7,500 personnel, an aircraft carrier, at least one cruiser, a destroyer squadron of at least two destroyers and/or frigates” (1141).and a carrier air wing of 65 to 70 aircraft. A carrier strike group also, on occasion, includes submarines, attached logistics ships and a supply ship. The carrier strike group commander operationally reports to the commander of the numbered fleet who is operationally responsible for the area of waters the carrier strike group is operating in.

 

Carrier strike groups comprise a principal element of U.S. power projection capability. Previously referred to as Carrier Battle Groups (a term still used by other nations), they are often referred to by the carrier they are associated with (e.g., Enterprise Strike Group). There are currently 11 carrier strike groups: five based on the West Coast, five based on the East Coast, and one forward-deployed to NS Yokosuka, Japan.

 

The carrier strike group is a flexible naval force that can operate in confined waters or in the open ocean, during day and night, in all weather conditions. The principal role of the carrier and its air wing within the carrier strike group is to provide the primary offensive firepower, while the other ships provide defense and support. These roles are not exclusive, however. Other ships in the strike group sometimes undertake offensive operations (launching cruise missiles, for instance) and the carrier's air wing contributes to the strike group's defense (through combat air patrols and airborne anti-submarine efforts). Thus, from a command and control perspective, carrier strike groups are combat organized by mission rather than by platform.

 

The development of U.S. Navy carrier battle group can be traced to the 1920s and was initially based on previous experience grouping battleships and other major surface combatants. In World War II, administratively, aircraft carriers were assigned to carrier divisions (CARDIVs). Operationally they were assigned to Task Forces, of which Task Force 11, Task Force 16 and Task Force 17 perhaps gained the most fame for their roles in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway. The single carrier battle group was born with the military draw down that followed World War II. At some point between 1969 and 1975, Carrier Divisions were redesignated Carrier Groups” (Ref. 937 & 1142).

 

“Throughout the 1990s, the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier groups were officially referred to as Carrier Battle Groups (CVBGs), and were commanded by either flag officers called Cruiser-Destroyer Group (CRUDESGRU) or Carrier Group (CARGRU) commanders” (Ref. 937 & 1143).

 

“In the Summer of 1992, the U.S. Navy instituted a concept which mandated greater task group integration of naval air and surface warfare assets into a more permanent carrier battle group structure. Each of the Navy's 12 existing carrier battle groups consisted of an aircraft carrier; an embarked carrier air wing; cruisers, destroyer, and frigate units; and two nuclear-powered attack submarines” (Ref. 937 & 1144).

 

“On 1 October 2004, carrier groups and cruiser-destroyer groups were redesignated carrier strike groups” (Ref. 937 & 1145).

“The change in nomenclature from 'Battle' to 'Strike' appears to have been connected with an increasing emphasis on projecting air power ashore; the change acknowledged that battles at sea on the Battle of Midway model were becoming more unlikely.

“Carrier strike groups are tasked to accomplish a variety of wartime missions, as well as a wide variety of functions in situations short of war. The peacetime mission is to conduct forward presence operations, to help shape the strategic environment, deter conflict, build interoperability with allies, and respond to crises when necessary. The U.S. Navy provides a regular rotation of strike groups overseas, typically for six-eight months, based on the needs of Unified Combatant Commands that request strike group capabilities in their respective area of responsibility (AOR). The ships in the group often “disaggregate” from the carrier, performing missions hundreds or even thousands of miles away. The missions of the carrier strike groups include:

 

· Power projection ashore against a wide range of strategic, operational, and tactical targets defended by sophisticated air defense systems, during day and night, in all weather conditions.

· Gaining and maintaining sea control including coastal regions, bounded seas, choke points, and the open ocean.

· Protection of commercial and military shipping.

· Protection of a United States Marine Corps Amphibious Ready Group prior to or during an amphibious operation.

· Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR).

· Surveillance/Intelligence to achieve and maintain a comprehensive operational picture of the littoral environment, including surface, undersea, air, and relevant land areas of interest.

· Command and Control of assigned U.S. and multinational forces.

· Establishing air superiority or air supremacy in an area by seizing and maintaining control of designated airspace.

· Theater ballistic missile defense (TBMD) of littoral areas and selected theater wide areas against attack.

· Operations in support of the peacetime presence mission, including supporting U.S. diplomacy through cooperative engagement with designated allied forces, normal peacetime operations, and shows of force” (Ref. 937 & 1146).

 

”CSGs are not restricted to a specific composition and can be modified depending on expected threats, roles, or missions expected during a deployment, and one may be different from another. The Navy states that “there really is no real definition of a strike group. Strike groups are formed and disestablished on an as needed basis, and one may be different from another. However, they all are comprised of similar types of ships” (Ref. 937 & 1146).

 

A U.S. Navy carrier strike group typically includes:

 

· A supercarrier, which is the centerpiece of the strike group and also serves as the flagship for the CSG Commander and his/her staff. The carrier is commanded by aviation community captain.

· A carrier air wing (CVW) typically consisting of up to nine squadrons. Carrier air wings are commanded by an aviation community captain (or occasionally a Marine colonel).

· One to two Aegis guided missile cruisers (CG), of the Ticonderoga class—a multi-mission surface combatant, equipped with BGM-109 Tomahawk missiles for long-range strike capability, each commanded by a surface community captain.

· A destroyer squadron (DESRON) commanded by a surface community captain (O-6) who commands the escort destroyers, with two to three guided missile destroyers (DDG), of the Arleigh Burke class—a multi-mission surface combatant, used primarily for anti-aircraft (AAW) and anti-submarine (ASW) warfare, but which also carries Tomahawk missiles for long-range strike capability. A destroyer is commanded by a surface community commander.

· Up to two attack submarines, usually of the Los Angeles-class used to screen the strike group against hostile surface ships and submarines, but which also carry Tomahawk missiles for long-range strike capability.

· A combined ammunition, oiler and supply ship (AOE/AOR), usually Supply-class (T-AOE); provides logistic support” (Ref. 937 & 1146).

 

While the carrier strike group is the various components' operational superior, administratively the ships and the carrier air wing are assigned to different U.S. Navy type commands (TYCOMs). Aircraft carriers and Carrier Air Wings are under the administrative control of Commander, Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet, or Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific. Escorts, including guided-missile cruisers and a CSG's destroyer squadron are under the administrative control of Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic or Commander, Naval Surface Forces, Pacific” (Ref. 937).

 

Composite Warfare Command structure

 

“The Strike Group comprises several commands, all which reside under the authority of the Commander of the CSG (CCSG or COMCARSTRKGRU). The CCSG is typically a 1-star rear admiral (lower half), who often promotes to 2-stars while in the job. He is the Immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) to the carrier, air wing, destroyer squadron, and cruiser commanding officers assigned to the strike group. As such, he is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and readiness for assigned ships and units, as well as maintaining administrative functions and material readiness tracking for ships and squadrons assigned to the group.

In battle, the CCSG is also known as the Composite Warfare Commander (CWC) who acts as the central command authority for the entire strike group. The CWC designates subordinate warfare commanders for various missions:

 

· Strike Warfare (STWC). The Strike Warfare Commander is usually the air wing commander. He sets the general strike philosophy and employs air wing aircraft as well as strike group Tomahawk missiles.

· Air Warfare (AWC). The commanding officer of one of the strike group cruisers is usually assigned as Air Warfare Commander. He is the only warfare commander not on the carrier, as the Combat Information Center (CIC) of AEGIS cruisers is specially designed for inner air battle functions.

· Command & Control, Space and Electronic Warfare (C2W). The space and electronic warfare commander acts as principal advisor to CWC for use and counter-use of the electromagnetic spectrum by friendly and enemy forces. He promulgates force Emissions Control (EMCON) restrictions, monitors organic and non-organic intelligence and surveillance sensors and develops operational deception and counter-targeting plans as appropriate.

· Surface Warfare (SUWC). The SUWC is responsible for surface surveillance coordination and war-at-sea.

· Undersea Warfare (USWC).

 

SUWC and USWC responsibilities are often combined into Sea Combat Commander (SCC), usually delegated to the DESRON

commander. He performs these duties from aboard the carrier due to its superior Command-Control-Communications-Computers and Intelligence (C4I) capabilities. Supporting the CWC and his warfare commanders are coordinators who manage force sensors and assets within the strike group” (Ref. 937).

 

List of Carrier Strike Groups

 

“The Navy maintains 11 carrier strike groups, 10 of which are based in the United States and one that is permanently homeported in Japan” (Ref. 937 & 1146).

 

“They were all redesignations of former Carrier Groups (CarGrus) and Cruiser-Destroyer Groups (CCDGs). The Fleet Response Plan requires that six CSGs be deployed or ready for deployment within 30 days at any given time, while two additional groups must be ready for deployment within 90 days” (Ref. 1147).

 

The Navy typically keeps at least one CSG in the U.S. Fifth Fleet in Southwest Asia and one in the U.S. Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific at all times. CSGs operate in the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean, and U.S. Fourth Fleet around the South American continent as they transit to from other areas. CSG Commanders report to their respective numbered-fleet commander, depending on where they are operating. When not deployed overseas west coast CSGs report to U.S. Third Fleet” (Ref. 937).

 

List of cruiser-destroyer groups – Ref. 937

 

U.S. Atlantic Fleet

 

Cruiser-Destroyer Group 2 (former CruDesFlot 2) - Carrier Strike Group Two (formerly CarGru 2) - Two, (CSG-2 or CARSTRKGRU 2) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. U.S. Navy carrier strike groups are employed in a variety of roles, all of which involve gaining and maintaining sea control as well as projecting naval airpower ashore. http://www.navy.mil/navydata/ships/carriers/powerhouse/cvbg.asp. The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) is the strike group's current flagship, and as of 2012, other units assigned to Carrier Strike Group Two include Carrier Air Wing Eight; the guided-missile cruisers USS Vella Gulf (CG-72), USS Monterey (CG-61), and USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55); and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 22:[7] USS Truxtun (DDG-103), USS Nitze (DDG-94), USS Mason (DDG-87), USS McFaul (DDG-74), USS Mahan (DDG-72), USS Cole (DDG-67), and USS Elrod (FFG-55); Naval Station Norfolk.

·  

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 4 - had USS Tidewater (AD-31) as flagship from 10 September to 13 November 1970

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 8 (former CruDesFlot 8)

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 10 (former CruDesFlot 10). USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is the strike group's current flagship, and as of 2012, other units assigned to Carrier Strike Group Ten include Carrier Air Wing Three embarked on board the Harry S. Truman, the guided-missile cruiser Antietam, and Destroyer Squadron 26

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 12 (former CruDesFlot 12, re-designated 30 June 1973)

· Carrier Strike Group Fourteen, designated CSG-14 or CARSTRKGRU 14, is one of five U.S. Navy carrier strike groups currently assigned the United States Fleet Forces Command. Carrier Strike Group Fourteen is currently the only U.S. carrier strike group that does not have an assigned aircraft carrier or carrier air wing.[4] Instead, as of December 2010, it directs the cruisers USS Gettysburg and USS Philippine Sea (CG-58). Carrier Strike Group Fourteen is currently based at Naval Station Mayport. Without a carrier flagship, it does not conduct the typical deployments of other carrier strike groups; instead, its two cruisers making independent voyages. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_Strike_Group_Fourteen

· Carrier Strike Group Four - Became Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic between July 2005 and February 2006

· Carrier Strike Group 6 (formerly CarGru 6) - USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67); CVW-17; Naval Station Mayport, Florida

· Carrier Strike Group Eight (formerly CarGru 8) - USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69); DESRON-28; Carrier Air Wing Seven; Naval Station Norfolk

· Carrier Strike Group Ten (formerly CCDG 2) - USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75); DESRON-26; Carrier Air Wing Three; Naval Station Norfolk

· Carrier Strike Group Twelve (formerly CCDG 8) - USS Enterprise (CVN-65); DESRON-2; Carrier Air Wing One; Naval Station Norfolk

Carrier Strike Group Fourteen (formerly CCDG 12) - Naval Station Mayport

 

List of cruiser-destroyer groups – Ref. 937

 

U.S. Pacific Fleet

 

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 1 or ComCruDesGru 1 (redesignated Carrier Strike Group Fifteen on 1 October 2004)/USS Constellation Battle Group: USS Lake Erie and USS Chosin)/ USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70); DESRON-1; Carrier Air Wing Seventeen; NAS North Island.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3 or ComCruDesGru 3 (former CruDesFlot 11//USS Abraham Lincoln Battle Group: USS Princeton and USS Chancellorsville)/USS Carl Vinson Battle Group: USS Shiloh, USS California and USS Arkansas) Carrier Strike Group Three (formerly CarGru 3); USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74); DESRON-21; Carrier Air Wing Nine; Naval Base Kitsap.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 5 or ComCruDesGru 5 (former CruDesFlot 9/Nimitz, the guided-missile cruiser Princeton, and Destroyer Squadron 23)/USS Kitty Hawk Battle Group: USS Cowpens and USS Antietam). Commander Carrier Group Five/Carrier Strike Group 5, (CSG-5 or CARSTRKGRU 5), is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the Pacific Fleet operating with the 7th Fleet forward Deployed. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) is the group's flagship(former /USS Independence Battle Group: USS Bunker Hill and USS Mobile Bay). As of 2012, other group components include Carrier Air Wing Five, USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Cowpens (CG-63), and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 15.. The group is based at U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Yokosuka, Japan; a U.S. carrier has been based there since 1973. The group also fulfills the functions of Battle Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 70) and Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75). http://www.ccsg5.navy.mil

· Carrier Strike Group Seven (formerly CarGru 7) - USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76); Destroyer Squadron 7; Carrier Air Wing Fourteen; Naval Air Station North Island

· Carrier Strike Group Nine (formerly Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3 or ComCruDesGru 3 (former CruDesFlot 11//USS Abraham Lincoln Battle Group: USS Princeton and USS Chancellorsville)/USS Carl Vinson Battle Group: USS Shiloh, USS California and USS Arkansas) Carrier Strike Group Three (formerly CarGru 3); USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74); DESRON-21; Carrier Air Wing Nine; Naval Base Kitsap.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 5 or ComCruDesGru 5 (former CruDesFlot 9/Nimitz, the guided-missile cruiser Princeton, and Destroyer Squadron 23)/USS Kitty Hawk Battle Group: USS Cowpens and USS Antietam). Commander Carrier Group Five/ Carrier Strike Group 5, (CSG-5 or CARSTRKGRU 5), is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the Pacific Fleet operating with the 7th Fleet forward Deployed. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) is the group's flagship(former /USS Independence Battle Group: USS Bunker Hill and USS Mobile Bay). As of 2012, other group components include Carrier Air Wing Five, USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS Cowpens (CG 63), and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 15.. The group is based at U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Yokosuka, Japan; a U.S. carrier has been based there since 1973. The group also fulfills the functions of Battle Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 70) and Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75). http://www.ccsg5.navy.mil

· Carrier Strike Group Eleven (formerly CCDG 5) - USS Nimitz (CVN-68); DESRON-23; Carrier Air Wing Eleven; NAS North Island

· Carrier Strike Group Fifteen (formerly CCDG 1) - USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) - Disestablished 21 March 2005 - Pacific coast

 

“Currently USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) does not have an embarked CSG since the carrier is currently going through its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)” (Ref. 937 & 937B).

 

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) does not have an embarked CSG since the carrier is currently going through its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)” (Ref. 937 & 937B).

 

“Carrier Strike Group Four was redesignated alongside the other groups in 2004, but has since been redesignated Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic. Carrier Strike Group Six was established from Carrier Group Six with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) at Naval Station Mayport in 2004, but seems to have since been disestablished. Carrier Strike Group Fifteen has been disestablished, and its flagship, the carrier Ronald Reagan, was re-assigned to Carrier Strike Group Seven” (Ref. 937).

 

“On 1 August 2011, the U.S. Navy announced that Carrier Strike Group Nine will change its permanent duty station from Naval Station Everett to Naval Base San Diego effective 14 December 2012. The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) will be re-assigned as the flagship for Carrier Strike Group Nine following the de-activation of Carrier Strike Group Seven. Abraham Lincoln will shift its homeport from Everett, Washington, to Newport News, Virginia, for its Refueling and Complex Overhaul in August 2012” (Ref. 937 & 937A).

 

“The deactivation of Carrier Strike Group Seven effective 30 December 2011 reflects the U.S. Navy's future budgetary reductions and the reduced availability of its operational carrier fleet and carrier air wings” (Ref. 937937C & 937D