USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 24 to 27 March 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise approaches Piraeus, Greece, for a scheduled port visit.

 

120328-N-FI736-033 - PIRAEUS, Greece (March 28, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) approaches Piraeus, Greece, for a scheduled port visit. Enterprise is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)

 

Sailors and guests mingle at a reception aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). Enterprise is in Piraeus, Greece, for a three-day port visit.

 

120328-N-JC800-148 PIRAEUS, Greece (March 28, 2012) Sailors and guests mingle at a reception aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Enterprise is in Piraeus, Greece, for a three-day port visit. Enterprise is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Heath Zeigler/Released)

 

Enterprise Hosts Reception in Piraeus, Greece

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) hosted a reception during a regularly scheduled three-day port visit to Piraeus, Greece on 28 March 2012. The reception, which provided an opportunity for the U.S. and Greece to highlight the partnership between the two countries, was attended by the U.S. Ambassador to Greece Daniel Bennett Smith. "I think having this reception aboard Enterprise sets a standard for relations with our European partners," said Smith. "The love and connectivity of everyone here just makes it a wonderful visit for the crew."

 

More than 900 Greek officials, Greek, European and U.S. military leadership, including Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet, and USS Vicksburg (CG-69) Commanding Officer Capt. Logan Jones were in attendance. "This is a unique opportunity for us to welcome Greek guests and other foreign guests to the largest aircraft carrier in the world," said Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. "I can't tell you how exciting it is for people to visit a carrier and to see it in person.

 

It's also a symbol of cooperation and history between our two countries." The event was held in the hangar bay and tours of the ship's spaces were provided to visitors interested in seeing the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. "To visit this legendary ship has its symbolism," said Hellenic Minister of Defense Dimitris Avramopooulos. "It comes at a very difficult moment for our country. So, the message the United States has sent to us is solidarity and friendship.

 

As President (Barack) Obama, Secretary (Hillary) Clinton and Ambassador Smith, have previously stated, 'We stand next to Greece.' We should never forget that we fight together for a supreme and noble cause." Enterprise Sailors were responsible for the set up and service during the event. Entertainment was provided by the U.S. Naval Forces Band, "Flagship," and the Enterprise Chorus.

 

"Tonight I had a conversation with the minister of defense," said Personnel Specialist Seaman Angelo Smith, an Enterprise Sailor. "We are happy to be here in their country, but yet they have the same amount of gratitude for having us here. I realized as an enlisted member that this is where it actually happens. Like they say, communication is key. That's not just for a relationships and friends, it is for nations."

During
Enterprise's stay in Piraeus, Sailors and Marines will have time to enjoy the sites and culture of Athens and the surrounding area before continuing with the ship's deployment. "Today we share a wish, for all of you to have a peaceful journey and always have honor in the duty served for the causes that bring us together," said Avramopooulos.

 

Enterprise is deployed as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group supporting Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120330-01 - Release Date: 3/30/2012 5:29:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry Andrew D. Gordon, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, PIRAEUS, Greece (NNS)).

 

ECSG Sailors, Marines Participate in Athens Project Handclasp

 

“Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ECSG) Sailors and Marines helped support the organization Doctors of the World on 29 March 2012 as part of the Navy's people-to-people program, "Project Handclasp."

Fifteen Sailors and Marines from aircraft carrier
USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Lt. Eddy Logan, guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg's (CG-69) command chaplain, teamed up to help those in need and foster a positive community relationship.

The organization has been located in Athens for nearly 15 years and its original mission of supporting women and children quickly turned into helping less fortunate families, immigrants, refugees and local communities in need of food, shelter, and medical assistance.

"Greeks love Americans and this project creates a great image that can be seen as 'Simply amazing,'" said U.S. Embassy Cultural Affairs Assistant Dimitria Lucas.

Volunteers involved helped with sorting and packing pharmaceuticals. Social workers and the organization's director were thankful for the efforts of the participants, who packed more than 100 boxes and cleared space for future use.

"When out and off the ship, it feels good to be able to give back to a community other than my own," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Sarah Coleman, an
Enterprise Sailor.

Vicksburg, a part of the ECSG, donated 1,500 medical items ranging from disposable adhesive bandages to cold wraps and other supplies necessary to maintain this non-profit organization.

This was the first visit to Athens by
Enterprise in more than 49 years, and the second visit by the U.S. Navy since Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67) visited several years ago.

According to
Enterprise volunteers, Sailors and Marines are always willing to help out, and in the end, it pays off and makes them want to do more whenever they are given the opportunity to do so.

"The pride and satisfaction you get from being able to make a difference is fantastic and rewarding," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Steven Dufresne, an Enterprise Sailor.

Doctors of the World asked for help from the Navy and Sailors and Marines came together so the mission could be accomplished” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS120402-09 - Release Date: 4/2/2012 5:33:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Britney Epps, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, ATHENS, Greece (NNS)).

 

USS Nitze Departs France

 

“The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) departed Villefranche, France on 29 March 2012 after a regularly-scheduled port visit. During the visit, the crew was able to enjoy some French culture and unwind after a busy Atlantic Ocean transit. "The culture was amazing," said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Valerie Goldfarb. "All of the food I ate was delicious. It was great to try things I have never eaten, or even heard of, before."

"France was great," said Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Justin Johnson. "It was beautiful, the food was really good and the people were very welcoming." Although there was a difference in language, it was still possible to get around and communicate.


"Communication was easy," said Goldfarb. "I was surprised with the amount of people who spoke English." During the port visit, there were several activities arranged by the
Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) committee for the crew to participate in, including a tour of Monaco and the famous Monte Carlo casino as well as a tour of a vineyard in Nice.

"Monaco was incredible," said Johnson. "I was walking down a street and there was a Ferrari dealership on the corner. That was pretty impressive and I am not sure if I will ever get to see something like that again." Some of the Sailors also participated in an event cleaning headstones at the Rhone American Military cemetery in nearby Draguignan, France.

"It is an honor to have these Sailors out here to clean the headstones and pay their respects to the service members who have gone before them," said Bruce Malone, the superintendant of the cemetery. The cemetery, where 861 Sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines are buried, is the final resting place for service members killed in the initial invasion of southern France during World War II.

"It was an unbelievable experience," said Goldfarb. "It means a lot to be able to come here and pay my respects just by helping out for a little while." "We heard the stories of a few of the people buried there and it really put into perspective that these are people just like me," said Johnson. "It really meant a lot."

During the visit, the ship also hosted tours for the Navy League as well as the mayor of Villefranche. Overall, the port visit was a huge success. "Everyone did a great job," said Senior Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Christopher Lewis. "The crew made
Nitze very proud. Everyone enjoyed the port and most importantly, learned something."

Nitze conducted this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120402-14 - Release Date: 4/2/2012 1:20:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, VILLEFRANCHE, France (NNS)).

USS James E. Williams Departs Port of Rome

 

“The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) departed Civitavecchia, Italy on 30 March 2012, after concluding a regularly-scheduled port visit. The visit served to continue U.S. 6th Fleet efforts to build global maritime partnerships with European nations and improve maritime safety and security in the region, while also giving the crew an opportunity to discover the rich culture of the region.

Civitavecchia is also known as the "Port of Rome," and apart from being a center for maritime transport and shipping in Italy, is linked to Rome by railway. The ease of access afforded the crew aboard
James E. Williams a unique opportunity to visit historic and culturally-significant sites within the surrounding area.

"Liberty, the ability to experience another country," said Cmdr. Christopher M. Senenko, commanding officer of
James E. Williams, "is a part of the culture of being a Sailor of the seas, and an important reason for why they joined."

"This is a first deployment and liberty port for about 70 percent of the crew," said Command Master Chief William G. Cramer, Command Master Chief of
James E. Williams. "I can't imagine a better first port visit," said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Pete J. Peterson, a Sailor aboard the destroyer. "We took tours of the Coliseum, Vatican City and wandered around Rome."

"The detail and magnitude of the monuments and ruins were eye-opening," said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class Carolyn L. Wilson. "I thought, 'Oh my gosh, no one would ever believe I was here.'" Sailors also attended tours arranged by the
James E. Williams' Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) committee, and were able to visit a winery and take guided tours of Rome.

"I was able to tour a winery," said Engineman 2nd Class Chad A. Hansen. "We explored an underground wine cellar, [received] a crash-course in the production of wine, and were given wine pairings with our appetizers and main course."

Through tours, sight-seeing, and local interaction, the crew played an important role in representing the U.S. Navy, said Cramer. "The crew has worked hard and proved they are a solid group of professionals and ambassadors of our country," said Cramer. "It was an amazing and exiting place for the crew to enjoy their first liberty port at the start of a promising deployment."

James E. Williams conducted this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120331-05 - Release Date: 3/31/2012 4:37:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Porter Departs Palma

 

“The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) departed Palma de Mallorca, Spain on 30 March 2012, concluding the first port visit of the ship's current deployment. While in port, Porter's crew got a chance to sample the local culture and cuisine, while also giving a little back to the community of Palma.

"There was a lot for our Sailors to do around here. Whether it was sightseeing,
MWR tours, shopping or simply just sampling the local food, there was plenty to do for everyone," said the ship's Executive Officer, Cmdr. Jennifer Couture. The crew also completed a community relations project, helping the town of Fornalutx recover from forest fires by planting a variety of trees and shrubs on the side of one of the tallest peaks on Palma.

"The area of Fornalutx, where we did the reforestation, is used by the public for weekend outings. The people of Palma go there to hike, have cookouts and to just enjoy the beauty of nature," said Machinery Repairman 1st Class Nathan D. Kopp,
Porter's community relations coordinator. "By planting new trees and shrubs, it will ensure that the park there remains open for many people to enjoy in the years to come."

Porter Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Martin F. Arriola, said the port visit was a successful one and furthered relations with our Spanish partners. "The crew performed their mission as ambassadors ashore tremendously, while simultaneously taking advantage of Palma's great food, sights and shopping," said Arriola.

The Hard Rock Caf
e in Palma also hosted the ship's off-duty rock band for a once-in-a-lifetime performance on a stage that commonly sees multi-platinum recording artists perform. "It was a big hit. There definitely weren't enough seats for everyone," said Culinary Specialist 2nd class (SW) Elijah M. Biron, a member of the ship's Supply Department and keyboardist. The band included seven Porter crew members..

The crew also enjoyed the local nightlife, getting a taste of the local cuisine. "The Paella was amazing. My goal was to sample the local food and do some sightseeing," said Gunner's Mate Seaman Shaina M. Hammack, assigned to the ship's
Weapons Department. After the last night of liberty, the crew shifted into a mission-oriented mindset. "Everyone had a great time, got a chance to relax and recharge, and we gave a little back to Palma. Now it's time to get underway to continue our mission," said Arriola.

Porter is currently deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120331-06 - Release Date: 3/31/2012 4:44:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, PALMA DE MALLORCA, Spain (NNS)).

 

Enterprise, Vicksburg Wrap Up Port Visit to Piraeus, Greece

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) departed Piraeus, Greece on 31 March 2012, following a scheduled three-day port visit.
While in Piraeus from 28 to 30 March 2012, Sailors from
Enterprise and Vicksburg enjoyed liberty ashore, took tours of the major historical sites of Athens coordinated by Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) and took some time to sample the local cuisine and do some shopping.

Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Sailors and Marines also participated in several community relations (COMREL) projects, ranging from a basketball tournament with the Hellenic Naval Academy basketball team to visits to SOS Village, a home for underprivileged children, and a local medical clinic.
Vicksburg donated approximately 1,500 medical items to the clinic, ranging from adhesive bandages to cold wraps and other supplies, which Sailors and Marines then sorted through and packed into boxes, while others cleared space for more donations.

"It's important for our Sailors to participate in COMRELs because it gives them a chance to really experience the local culture, not just from the perspective of a tourist, but to see the real lives of the people of that country," said Lt. Cmdr. Henry Holcombe, a chaplain aboard Enterprise.
Enterprise personnel also played in a basketball tournament at the Hellenic Naval Academy, and visited SOS Village, a place for underprivileged children, to help clean up, do some landscaping, and sort donated items for distribution.

"When out and off the ship, it feels good to be able to give back to a community other than my own," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Sarah Coleman. Many of those not participating in the COMRELs took advantage of a slate of trips arranged by
MWR. MWR tours allowed Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Sailors and Marines to visit historical sites around Greece. One tour took service members to Mount Parnassus, home of the Sanctuary of Apollo and Omphalos, believed by ancient Greeks to be the center of the world.

Another tour brought Sailors to Corinth, home to the fountain of Pirene and the Bema. Other tours took Sailors to
Cape Sounion, near the Aegean Sea and home to the Temple of Poseidon. Most of the primary tours allowed service members to experience the rich, cultural heritage of the city of Athens, named for the goddess Athena. Tour routes took Sailors to the Parthenon, the Olympic Stadium, the Acropolis, the Theater of Herod Atticus, and the Theater of Dionysus.

 

"I chaperoned a tour that went around the historical sites of Athens, and I would volunteer to do it again," said Chief Electrician's Mate Bruscha Williams. "All the young Sailors aboard should take time to go on a tour because it's a great way to learn about the local culture, and maybe see some things they wouldn't come across if they were out exploring on their own." Sailors and Marines also led tours aboard Enterprise for over 700 Hellenic military personnel (fire, police, and Embassy staff) and local residents. Tour routes allowed visitors a glimpse into life aboard the carrier while Sailors demonstrated the capabilities of various aircraft and equipment.

Enterprise and Vicksburg departed Piraeus to continue supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120402-08 - Release Date: 4/2/2012 5:31:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) entered the Mediterranean Sea on 31 March 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise Celebrates 119 Years of the Chief Petty Officer

 

“Chief petty officers (CPO) assigned to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held a ceremony celebrating the 119th birthday of the Chief Petty Officers on 1 April 2012, while underway in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. The celebration provided the chiefs' mess with an opportunity to come together to honor, celebrate and learn about the history of the CPO rank. "Today we gather here to pay homage to 119 years of the chief petty officer," said Senior Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician Mark Farley. "What better place than the chiefs' mess aboard USS Enterprise as she sails on her final deployment defending freedom and our way of life."

Chiefs from all departments gathered to listen to the words of Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, recollecting time he spent learning from the chief's mess. "Chief petty officers have been influencing me since the first day I put on a uniform," said Carter, an honorary Master Chief Petty Officer. Carter was given this honorary title by former Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Joe Campa. "As I went from my days as a midshipman and got into my field in aviation, I was always surrounded by chiefs," said Carter. "That really helped me understand how important it was for leadership to talk to young Sailors and how to get them to understand what it is that you're trying to say to them."

Farley then reflected on the combination of the history of ships to bear the name Enterprise, and the chiefs who served aboard them. "On our 25
th birthday, [the sixth ship named] Enterprise was patrolling the seas during World War I," said Farley. "On our 50th birthday, [the seventh] Enterprise (CV-6) destroyed the remainder of the Japanese Navy in the South Pacific. She would later become the most decorated ship of World War II." He then reminded the mess that as this history was being made, chiefs were present, just as they have been throughout the last 119 years; leading, mentoring and training.

"The importance of an
Enterprise chief remembering the CPO Birthday is not what is important," said Enterprise Command Master Chief Eric. J. Young. "It is more important for us, the Mess, to remember what it means to be a chief. 'Why do we do what we do? Why do we mentor, lead, manage, and train?' We do it because it is in us to make the Sailors around us better than they would have ever thought they could be. As chiefs, when our Sailors are better, we the chiefs are better. When the Chiefs are at their best, then Enterprise will always be the best warship on the waterfront. We remember and celebrate success as chiefs on the CPO birthday."

During the Enterprise celebration, Chief Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Marilyn Ferguson also read the birthday message written by MCPON Rick West for the chiefs of the entire U.S. Navy, and participants wrapped up the event with a cake-cutting ceremony. Enterprise is underway conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120402-03 - Release Date: 4/2/2012 5:11:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Arrives in U.S. 5th Fleet

 

“The world's first nuclear-powered USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12 arrived in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) on 3 April 2012.

Prior to arrival in theater, the Enterprise CSG successfully completed a robust training cycle, where the crew was presented with various scenarios and situations they might face while deployed. These exercises involved simulated maritime security operations, counter-piracy operations, and theater security cooperation engagements.

"We've trained hard since our last deployment to the region making sure that the capabilities we bring remain flexible, adaptable and persistent," said Rear Adm. Walter E. Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. "
Enterprise has been deploying to this region for 50-years, and we are looking forward to serving along side our coalition and regional partners in support of operations in the region."

Enterprise CSG joins the Abraham Lincoln CSG to support the combatant commander's operational requirements, while ensuring security and stability in the U.S. 5
th Fleet AOR. Enterprise CSG consists of: USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and embarks Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1; guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69); and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2, comprised of guided-missile destroyers USS Nitze (DDG-94), USS Porter (DDG-78) and USS James E. Williams (DDG-95).

Enterprise departed its homeport of Norfolk for its final deployment, March 11th. The ship conducted a port visit to Piraeus, Greece, for three days before transiting the Suez Canal. Following the deployment, Enterprise will be inactivated, and eventually decommissioned” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120404-05 - Release Date: 4/4/2012 12:58:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry Andrew D. Gordon, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

The guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) transits the Suez Canal. Nitze is assigned to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group,

 

120404-N-AP176-019 - SUEZ CANAL (April 4, 2012) - The guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) transits the Suez Canal. Nitze is assigned to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, which is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton/Released)

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) entered the Mediterranean Sea on 31 March 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Suez Canal, her 18th transit since her commission on 20 November 1998 and entered the Red Sea on 4 April 2012” (Ref. 362H).


USS Nitze Completes PASSEX with Egyptian Ship

 

“Guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with Egyptian Navy corvette ship El Suez (F941) on 6 April 2012.

"The
PASSEX provides an opportunity to strengthen military-to-military relations as well as demonstrate the resolve we share to promote maritime security in this region," said Cmdr. Christopher Nerad, Nitze's commanding officer.

During the
PASSEX, Egyptian officers were embarked aboard Nitze to observe, as well as to help communicate with El Suez.

The
PASSEX gave each ship the opportunity to guide the other in a series of coordinated division tactical maneuvers.

El Suez steamed alongside
Nitze for several hours during the exercise.

"The exercise was tremendously successful and mutually beneficial," said Nerad. "We proved that we can operate together at sea. It was a great learning experience and honor to have an opportunity to work with the Egyptian Navy."

Nitze is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120418-30 - Release Date: 4/18/2012 10:29:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS NITZE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Vicksburg Completes NMCRS Fundraising Drive

 

“Guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) completed its annual Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) fundraiser on 6 April 2012. The fundraising took place throughout the month of March and the first week of April, raising a total of $37,647.00.

The NMCRS is an organization that awards no-interest loans and, in some cases, grants to Sailors and Marines in financial distress. The organization also provides a variety of other services designed to help active, retired and reserve Sailors and Marines through difficult times.

"I am proud of the crew," said Chief Engineman (SW) Jeremy W. Mayfield, NMCRS coordinator for
Vicksburg. "We had 100-percent contact through our divisional representatives and we made our message clear, making it very easy to raise the money."

Vicksburg raised her donations through allotments and fundraisers which included a day off of duty, pizza deliveries from the Vicksburg chain of command and a "pie-in-the-face" raffle. The pie-in-the-face raffle alone raised $5,181.

"It was fun for me and the crew," said Lt. j.g. Kathryn E. Rosenberg, fire control officer aboard
Vicksburg. "All chiefs and officers have a story about how one of their Sailors was helped by NMCRS and I was happy to sacrifice for a good cause."

Some Sailors, who have asked for help in the past, took this opportunity to give back to a cause in which they believe. "I've {used NMCRS} before," said Culinary Specialist Seaman Andrew R. Durst. "I had an emergency back home, I didn't have money, and they helped me out. "I really believe in {NMCRS}. Plus it just feels good to throw a pie in your boss's face."

Durst paid $130.00 to throw a pie.
Vicksburg averaged approximately $105.00 per Sailor in donations. Approximately $26,000.00 came from pay allotments and $11,000.00 came from other fundraising activities. Vicksburg is on her final deployment and is slated to decommission in 2013.

Vicksburg is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120409-16 - Release Date: 4/9/2012 9:42:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Red Sea from 5 to 6 April 2012, passing through the Bab el-Mandeb Strait and entered the Gulf of Aden on the 2nd” (Ref. 76). 


The Bab-el-Mandeb (variously transliterated Mandab or Mandib, and with article "el-" given also as "al-", with or without connecting dashes) meaning "Gate of Scars" in Arabic (باب المندب), is a strait located between Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula (northeast), Djibouti and Eritrea, north of Somalia, in the Horn of Africa (southwest), that connects the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean (southeast). It is sometimes called the Mandab Strait in English” (Ref. 1266).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) entered the Arabian Sea on 7 April 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise Sailors Attend Easter Sunrise Service While Deployed

 

“Sailors and Marines attended an Easter Sunday sunrise service aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 8 April 2012.

Sailors of many different religious backgrounds gathered on the flight deck to observe the Easter Sunday celebration led by Cmdr. John Owen,
Enterprise Command Chaplain.

"This is an Easter that you will always remember," said Owen. "There are very few people at home that will be able to say they spent Easter out at sea."

Enterprise Sailors and Marines enjoyed the opportunity to celebrate the Easter holiday in such a unique and memorable setting.

"I have been to about three other at-sea Easter Sunday services but this is by far the best one," said Yeoman 2nd Class Jacqueline L. Martinez.

Since the crew is made up of members from multiple faiths, the Easter service was non-denominational. Holding this type of celebration allowed every participant the opportunity to enjoy a holiday service, regardless of their individual beliefs.

"It is important that we take care of all our Sailors," said Religious Program Specialist 1st Class Gustavo M. Ortiz,
Religious Ministries Department leading petty officer.

The
Enterprise Chorus sang hymns throughout the service, which were followed by prayer.

Capt. Roderick Clayton recited scripture from the Bible and Lt. Cmdr. Jon Settlemoir, Carrier Air Wing 1 command chaplain, gave the benediction during the holiday celebration.

Settlemoir prayed during the service, "Lord God it has been an honor to stand here on the flight deck of the
USS Enterprise for the last Easter Sunrise Service this ship will enjoy."

Enterprise is currently on its final scheduled deployment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120409-11 - Release Date: 4/9/2012 9:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory A. Pickett II, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Porter Enters Gulf of Aden, Joins CTF 151

 

“Guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) arrived in the Gulf of Aden on 8 April

2012, to join with Combined Maritime Forces, Combined Task Force (CTF) 151.

CTF 151, a multi-national, mission-based task force based in Bahrain, conducts counter-piracy operations in the
Southern Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Somali Basin, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean.

"This is important work out here," said Cmdr. Martin F. Arriola, USS
Porter commanding officer. "The nature of our potential missions here requires Porter to be ready at all times."

Porter will collaborate with the other ships operating under CTF 151 to disrupt and prevent piracy along the shipping lanes, enhancing security and stability in the region” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120411-01 - Release Date: 4/11/2012 5:34:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, GULF OF ADEN (NNS)).

#SAAM: For James E. Williams SAPR Rep, It's Personal

 

As  reported  on 8 April 2012, “the command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) representative aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) witnessed firsthand how a sexual assault impacted the life of one young female Sailor. Chief Information Systems Technician Megan C. Gibbs spoke about how the young Sailor had been frightened of the repercussions should anyone found out, and she was embarrassed that it had happened. She didn't know who to turn to, and worst of all, she didn't think anyone would believe her.

She became withdrawn, and afterwards, she chose to leave the U.S. Navy upon completion of her first tour. For Gibbs, spreading awareness of sexual assault is a cause she strives to take to the deckplates to prevent stories like this from ever happening again. Along with Gibbs, service members from all branches of the United States military have banded together in solidarity to recognize Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). The goal of SAAM is to reduce sexual assault through direct and sustained engagement of all hands.

 

From placing teal ribbons and posters around the ship, to conducting training and counseling, Sailors aboard James E. Williams are actively participating in the effort to raise awareness of the impact sexual assault has on both the individual and the crew. "As SAPR representatives, we provide immediate assistance to sexually assaulted victims," said Gibbs. "We provide them with resources, medical care, and proper reporting." While response is necessary in dealing with the fallout of sexual assault, SAPR representatives incorporate a variety of training aids to educate the crew on what sexual assault is, how it can thwart the mission, and what resources are available to victims. "We use Powerpoint presentations, scenario cards, and training videos," said Gibbs.

 

"These are just a few of the methods we have to reach the crew." Gibbs hopes these training aids also help reduce and prevent sexual assault from occurring. "Some people have it stuck in their mind that because she didn't say 'no,' or the person was 'asking for it', that the perpetrator feels it's acceptable to engage in sexual acts with the victim," said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ashley R. Thomson, a SAPR victim advocate aboard James E. Williams. "But is really comes down to 'no' means 'no', because without consent it's sexual assault." Thomson stresses that the individual assaulted is not the only one affected. "It puts a strain on both the victim and the command," said Thomson.

 

"The command might lose the Sailors involved, or it can cause people to become mentally unfit to do their job." The effects of sexual assault can erode operational readiness and create a tense and high-pressure workplace, which can lead to a breakdown in performance. "It makes people worry that it can happen to them; their shipmates, their friends, and they can be constantly uneasy about what happened to them, or they can breakdown and shut everything out," said Thomson. By making the program noticeable around the command through flyers, sexual assault ribbons, and by providing resources for the crew, SAPR advocates work to prevent sexual assault and ensure victims receive the proper attention, said Thomson.

 

"Servicemembers are taught to take care of each other," said Gibbs. "We are here to accomplish our mission, and sexual assault terribly hinders that." Sexual Assault Prevention is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st century Navy and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the department.

 

Scripts and videos for each week's theme have been provided to commanding officers to help facilitate discussion throughout their commands. These engagement products, in addition to talking points, posters and other tools, are posted to Navy Personnel Command's Sexual Assault and Prevention website, http://www.sapr.navy.mil. Help raise awareness by joining the conversation on social media using #SAAM” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120408-01 - Release Date: 4/8/2012 1:44:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Enterprise Hosts Passover Seder

 

“Sailors and Marines of the Jewish faith came together to celebrate Passover Seder aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on the evening of 11 April 2012. Cmdr. Joel D. Newman, a Rabbi from Naval Base Coronado, visited Enterprise and hosted the Seder in the commanding officer's in-port cabin. "Passover is a holiday that lasts eight days," said Newman. "During the Passover holiday, there is a special service that takes place in the home, which, in this case, is the ship. That service is called the Passover Seder."

Newman said Seder occurs once, or sometimes twice, during the eight-day holiday. The Seder is a meal that is usually prepared kosher. The purpose of the Seder is to retell the story of the Jewish exodus from Egypt. "It is our way of celebrating the freedom of the Jews and the fact that our people aren't in slavery anymore," said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Kyle Z. Shankle, an
Enterprise Sailor. Sailors read from a book called the Passover Hagaddah as they gathered around the dining tables. The Hagaddah opens and reads from right to left, the same as Hebrew. There are certain traditional rituals that occur during the meal. Everything is done in an orderly fashion. Sailors and Marines recited prayers, songs and scripture in both Hebrew and English. Each food item presented at the Seder represents something, and serves a specific purpose.

 

For instance, a hard-boiled egg represents rebirth and a cup of water represents the healing waters of the prophetess Miriam's well, as recorded in Scripture. Because Israelites were farmers and shepherds in ancient times, it is meant for people to feel a connection with the food eaten and harvested from the land on Passover. Another tradition involves the act of dipping foods as a reminder of the Pascal Offering that delivered the Jews from death in Egypt. Those Jews dipped a bunch of hyssop into the blood of sacrificial lambs, and painted it on their doorposts, so that the angel of death would "pass over" their homes. In remembrance of this, the Seder was served with a cup of salt water for dipping. A glass of wine was also served at the Seder. This was instead of the usual four glasses. Wine represents joy, and a drop of joy was removed from the glass of wine for each plague that God brought upon Egypt, according to Scripture.

 

The Seder was also served with a slice of orange, an apple and nut mixture, and various other items including matzah (unleavened bread). "It is usually a little bit longer and a little more of the Torah is read at our Seders back home, but the people and atmosphere that we had here felt a lot like home," said Shankle. "It is a privilege to celebrate Seder on the Enterprise," said Newman. "For the command to support it is a huge evolution. For them to support me with the COD (carrier onboard delivery), turnover the chaplain's staff, offer the commanding officer's cabin, and help with cooks is a lot for such a small group of people. This is one of the best I have ever had"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120414-03 - Release Date: 4/14/2012 6:28:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed through the Arabian Sea on the 7th to the North Arabian Sea operating from 8 to 12 April 2012 en route to the Persian Gulf via the Strait of Hormuz” (Ref. 76).

 

#SAAM: Enterprise Sailors Participate in Sexual Assault Awareness Month

 

As reported on 15 April 2012 “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) is conducting training and promoting the Sexual Assault Awareness Month campaign throughout the month of April. Enterprise Sailors are focusing on the awareness and prevention of sexual assault in support of the overall DoD theme, "Hurts One, Affects All." "We're completely invested in this program," said USS Enterprise Executive Officer Capt. Greg Huffman.

 

"On board Enterprise, as is the case everywhere else in our Navy, sexual assault is not tolerated. Through the awareness generated by the SAAM initiative, it is our goal to ensure each and every Sailor and Marine aboard “Big E” completely understands that the prevention of sexual assault is an all-hands effort. Sexual assault not only negatively impacts our readiness, but also the well being of our crew. We must be more proactive in preventing any and all such incidents from occurring."

In an effort to achieve this goal, SAAM training is being provided throughout the month to the Sailors and Marines aboard the
“Big E” via the Plan of the Day, "The Shuttle" newspaper, brochures, video vignettes, khaki-led divisional quarters and during command indoctrination class, said Navy Career Counselor 1st Class Linda H. Gilmore, an Enterprise Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) representative. "This is an effort driven by Enterprise's leadership," said Huffman.

 

"Every Sailor and Marine has the right to a workplace free of discrimination, harassment and assault. It is incumbent upon our leadership to ensure that this type of environment is provided. This can only occur if we, in leadership positions, train and educate our people on the negative impacts of sexual assault and how it can be eliminated." According to Huffman, this is being accomplished through full participation in SAAM. The command's SAAM initiative consists of three phases.

 

The first phase, "Hurts One, Affects All," informs service members that even a single incident of sexual assault negatively impacts combat readiness and effectiveness. The second phase, "Prevention is Everyone's Duty," focuses on how Sailors and Marines must lookout for one another, both on and off duty, to prevent harm. The third phase, "We Will Not Tolerate Sexual Assault," stresses the fact that sexual assault is a problem affecting everyone in the military, regardless of service or paygrade, and must be eliminated through an all-hands effort.

 

Enterprise is committed to doing its part. The “Big E” is embracing the Navy's SAAM month mission and is actively working to increase awareness and prevention among its crew members. Additional support and information regarding sexual assault prevention can be found at www.sapr.navy.mil. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.

 

The Department of the Navy is working to aggressively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sexual assault victims, and to hold offenders accountable. Help raise awareness by joining the conversation on social media using #SAAM” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120415-01 - Release Date: 4/15/2012 3:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed through the Arabian Sea on the 7th to the North Arabian Sea operating from 8 to 12 April 2012 en route to the Persian Gulf via the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman, entering the Persian Gulf on 16 April 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) fighter Keith Jardine demonstrates grappling moves during an exhibition in the hangar bay aboard aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65).

 

120416-N-FI736-024 - ARABIAN GULF (April 16, 2012) - Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) fighter Keith Jardine demonstrates grappling moves during an exhibition in the hangar bay aboard aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Jardine and Rich Franklin, both UFC superstars, visited the ship to meet U.S. Sailors and Marines and sign autographs as part of a regional United Service Organization (USO) tour. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)

 

UFC Fighters Visit “Big E”

 

“Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) fighters visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 16 April 2012.

UFC superstars Rich Franklin and Keith Jardine toured
“Big E” during the ship's final deployment to meet U.S. Sailors and Marines, sign autographs and give a grappling demonstration.

While onboard, Jardine and Franklin enlisted the help of a Sailor and several Marines, assigned to the Thunderbolts of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 251, during a demonstration of wrestling moves and jiu-jitsu techniques. They also answered questions from those observing in the crowd.

"These visits build morale," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 1st Class Brandon Breitberg. "It's good to break up our high-tempo operational schedule every once in a while and watch a demonstration with two great fighters. It's also nice to see them interacting with Sailors and Marines."

After the demo, hundreds of crew members patiently waited in line as the fighters took photographs and signed autographs.

"It's really exciting for these particular fighters to have come to our ship," said Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Robert Gardner. "I have seen them on TV, but to be able to meet and interact with them is something entirely different."

After the autograph and photo session, Franklin and Jardine ate lunch with members of the ship's crew on the aft mess decks.

"You hear people say 'support your troops;' well, I come out and do things like this," said Rich Franklin, former UFC middleweight champion. "We enjoy coming out to visit ships, especially when these service members are deployed for so many months at a time."

The fighters also took a tour of
Enterprise, making stops at flight deck control, primary flight control, the Enterprise Room, and observing flight operations.

"This is the least I can do, to come out here and show gratitude to the people that make it possible for me to do what I do on a daily basis," said Franklin to the service members. "I truly appreciate what you are doing out here and thank you."

Enterprise
is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120419-17 - Release Date: 4/19/2012 1:42:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry Andrew D. Gordon, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

#SAAM: Enterprise SAPR Representatives Play Key Role in Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention

 

As reported on 16 April 2012 “as USS Enterprise (CVN-65) continues its participation in Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), one group of Sailors onboard are particularly invested in the training and education of the crew to prevent incidents of sexual assault. This group consists of Enterprise's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) representatives, and for them, SAAM is a year-round effort. Each department onboard Enterprise has an appointed SAPR representative and, although these representatives are helping guide the training occurring aboard Enterprise this month, their mission doesn't end when SAAM concludes on 30 April 2012.

The SAPR team aboard the ship is always readily available to not only provide training on the negative impacts of sexual assault, but to also assist any Sailor who may be a victim. "Command readiness is affected by sexual assault," said Navy Career Counselor 1st Class Linda H. Gilmore, one of
Enterprise's SAPR representatives. "It is important to have SAPR representatives on board to educate, train, bring awareness, and provide support if needed." Gilmore explained that the role of a SAPR Victim Advocate is to provide effective and appropriate support and guidance for victims of sexual assault.

 

In addition to helping victims and informing the crew during scheduled training events such as those held during SAAM, dedicated SAPR victim advocates like Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Sonia R. Strickland, ensure that the medical staff aboard Enterprise receives additional training. "Once a victim makes a report, medical plays a big role in the process of sexual assault cases," said Strickland. "As one of the victim advocates on board, I conduct the primary training with the medical staff so they are aware of the proper procedures to go through." Strickland created a sexual assault forensic exam instruction, so the medical team is prepared in the event of an incident.

 

The kit includes step-by-step instructions so they know what to do and who to contact.
SAPR representatives are supported by the SAPR chain of command on board. Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Cheri R. Snaza, one of two command liaisons, is responsible for maintaining communication with the regional sexual assault response coordinator (SARC) in Norfolk and providing the SAPR advocates with the time and education necessary to perform their roles successfully. "It is important for us to provide the advocates with the support they need," said Snaza. "If we, as leaders, fail to provide our advocates with the tools needed to do their jobs effectively, then we have failed not only that individual, but every victim who tries to get help."

 

Strickland stressed that if a Sailor or Marine needs help, they will receive the complete attention and full effort of the SAPR team. "We want victims to know that we are here for them," said Strickland. "Regardless of the fears or road blocks that may be encountered, victims need to know they have a place to go and someone to talk to who will listen and do their very best to help." Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.

 

The Department of the Navy is working to aggressively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sexual assault victims, and to hold offenders accountable. Help raise awareness by joining the conversation on social media using #SAAM” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120416-09 - Release Date: 4/16/2012 3:38:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

USO Sponsored Group Visits “Big E'”

 

“The vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and celebrity guests visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of a United Service Organization (USO) tour on 17 April 2012. Adm. James A. "Sandy" Winnefeld and a group of celebrities thanked the Sailors and Marines aboard the ship for their service by bringing them a break from the rigors of carrier life.

Joining the vice chairman on the USO tour were comedian/actor Anthony Anderson, former Major League Baseball pitcher Randy "The Big Unit" Johnson, performer Jason "Wee-Man" Acua, TV and film actor Dennis Haysbert, Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders Allyson Traylor, Brittany Evans and Kelsi Reich and former "American Idol" contestants Diana DeGarmo and Ace Young.

Winnefeld, was Enterprise's 17
th commanding officer and was in command on September 11, 2001 and during the beginning of the subsequent war in Afghanistan. He said there is a special place in his heart for "Big E." "It's really nice to be back to the ship I love, the airplanes I love, and the crew," said Winnefeld. "What a thrill to be here." Winnefeld expressed his appreciation of and admiration for Enterprise Sailors and Marines, especially during Enterprise's final deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

During the show, the celebrities also expressed their appreciation for the dedication, sacrifice and hard work service members give for their country every day. Dallas Cowboys cheerleader, Brittney Evans said, "This is our 74
th USO tour, my 6th and I love seeing those that fight for our country." In addition to addressing the crew, Diana DeGarmo and Ace Young entertained the crew with a musical performance. "We have fun doing this," said DeGarmo.

 

"This is my second tour and I love coming out here to see what goes on and give back to all the men and women who serve." "The USO has a fantastic history, decades and decades, of coming out and entertaining our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen," said Winnefeld. "I'm really proud to have these guys here with us."

 

Afterwards, the celebrity guests were given a tour of the ship and a chance to experience aircraft launching from Enterprise's flight deck. "It is fun being out here and seeing how you guys operate," said Acua. "The flight deck was amazing and I was just blown away at just how efficiently it runs." Enterprise crew members were given the opportunity to take pictures with, and receive signed autographs from, the celebrities.

 

Enterprise is on its final deployment, deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, conducting Maritime Security Operations efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120418-16 - Release Date: 4/18/2012 5:06:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff A. Willadsen Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

 USS Enterprise and USNS Supply conduct a replenishment at sea.

 

120418-N-PK218-007 - ARABIAN GULF (April 18, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE-6) conduct a replenishment at sea. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott/Released)

 

Enterprise Completes Replenishment-at-Sea

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE-6) on 18 April 2012.

During the
RAS, Enterprise took on supplies, such as food, mail and fuel, among other necessities, essential to the ship's mission and crew morale.

"We received everything from milk to chips," said Master Chief Culinary Specialist Thaddeus T. Wright. "We had both dry and frozen provisions come in."

The replenishment of food supplies is necessary to feed large crews while underway.

The most anticipated supply brought on during each
RAS, however, is mail. Receiving mail during deployment is one of the most powerful morale boosters for the crew.

Yeoman 3rd Class Michael A. Nye said
Enterprise took on more than 1,500 pounds of mail during the aircraft carrier's most recent RAS.

Fifteen hundred pounds of mail is relatively small when compared to the amount of fuel
"Big E" brought aboard.

"We brought on 1.2 million gallons of fuel today," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Fuel) 2nd Class Tanisha F. Glass. "We try to stay on top of our fuel - especially since we're using nearly 100,000 gallons per day for regular flight operations."

An aircraft carrier cannot fulfill its mission without enough fuel aboard to refill its aircraft, so replenishing fuel is an essential part of
Enterprise's mission.

"We will start taking on mail and fuel a lot more, as well as food, soda, and things for the ship's store. Everyone wins during these evolutions," said Wright.

The
RAS is a critical evolution and requires the efforts of many crew members to complete it swiftly and efficiently.

"Replenishment at sea is a very organized process," said Nye. "It takes a lot of players to make sure everything goes smoothly and according to plan."

The team effort put forth by the 250-man working party as they work together to ensure that each
RAS is carried out successfully is valued by everyone involved.

"I truly appreciate everyone that comes out to help," said Wright. "Each person makes a difference"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS120423-07 - Release Date: 4/23/2012 5:50:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Vicksburg Conducts Multinational Operations

 

“Guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) conducted weeklong combined operations with French anti-air destroyer FS Cassard (D-614) from 16 to 21 April 2012.

The operations were designed to leverage cooperative relationships to safeguard the region's vital links to the global economy.

Cassard is deployed from its homeport of Toulon, France and is operating in the U.S. 5
th Fleet area of operations in concert with Enterprise Carrier Strike Group.

"We have had good interactions, we are operating as a joint force," said Lt. Jeremy Bourdeverre, missile officer aboard Cassard, who spent six days aboard
Vicksburg. "My job is to make sure we have good communication between ships and {the Vicksburg crew} has made that easy."

Cassard was designed to protect an aircraft carrier, which made it a good fit with Enterprise Carrier Strike Group.

"We have the same mission and we came together seamlessly," said Lt. j.g. Barbour West,
Combat Electronics Division officer and bridge watchstander aboard Vicksburg.

Visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) teams from both ships have also trained together with Cassard's team boarding Vicksburg, then Vicksburg's team boarding Cassard.

"We have different styles, but have learned a lot from each other." said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Christopher A. Zola, a member of the
Vicksburg VBSS team.

Vicksburg is on its final deployment, operating with Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and is slated to decommission in 2013.

Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120510-17 - Release Date: 5/10/2012 2:47:00 PM  - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Conducts Multinational Training

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) conducted integrated mission training with French navy anti-aircraft destroyer Cassard (D-614) and British navy air defense destroyer HMS Daring (D-32) in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility on 21 April 2012. The naval forces conducted training to strengthen the crews' tactical proficiency and ability to integrate effectively during Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation engagements. "This is essentially a passing exercise (PASSEX) and an opportunity to work with the French and British navies," said Cmdr. Richard Brawley, operations officer for Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12. "Cassard has conducted a lot of the air defense duties for us."

Daring participated in the PASSEX for five days with tactical control of Daring transferring to Enterprise for two days. By transferring tactical control, the Enterprise's staff determined the British navy ship's movements and operations. During the remainder of the training, Daring acted as an independent operator. "We integrated Daring into gunnery, anti-submarine warfare, and air defense exercises," said Brawley. During the integrated mission training, Enterprise and Vicksburg exchanged liaison naval officers (LNOs) with Cassard to support communication between the leadership of all the ships. Each LNO is a subject matter expert for their ship.

"My first job aboard
Enterprise is to ensure that you understand all the things that we are supposed to do on our ship," said Lt. j.g. Hassan El-Eter, French LNO aboard Enterprise. "The Americans were there to help us with anything we needed, and it was a good team effort." Sailors assigned to the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team aboard Vicksburg trained with Sailors of the boarding team from Cassard, allowing members of the teams to exchange ideas about the most efficient and effective ways to conduct boarding exercises.

"
Vicksburg and Cassard VBSS teams practiced boarding each other's ships," said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Corey Woll, a Vicksburg VBSS team member. "Most coalition units are part of counter-piracy operations, and understanding how other nations board vessels has been very helpful." The commanding officers of both Cassard and Daring visited Enterprise during the exercise; touring the ship to gain firsthand experience aboard the United States' first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and learn about its tactical capabilities.

Rear Adm. Walter E. Carter, Jr., commander of CSG 12, and his staff also had the opportunity to tour
Cassard and Daring. "We learned a lot about the way our allied partners operate their ships and their capabilities," said Brawley. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th  Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120510-16 - Release Date: 5/10/2012 2:46:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

James E. Williams Focuses on Conservation

 

“As Earth Week kicked off around the world on 22 April 2012, guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) followed suit with a concerted effort to minimize the ship's footprint. James E. Williams limits waste, conserves water, and properly disposes of their hazardous material to preserve the integrity of the world's oceans.

"It's an all-hands effort aboard the destroyer to reach this goal, as all Sailors are educated and responsible for sorting trash, limiting water usage, and properly handling hazardous material," said Lt. Nathaniel S. Edge, supply officer aboard
James E. Williams. Culinary Specialist 1st Class Arthur W. Hoskins, chief stores custodian and supervisor of the ship's waste management program, explains that the crew participated by separating their trash into plastics, food, paper and metal.

Once the trash is separated, the ship employs various pieces of equipment to dispose of this waste: a pulper and metal shredder are used to breakdown biodegradable waste for absorption back into the environment, and a plastic waste processor compresses plastic products into discs or "pucks."

"The plastic pucks are held on board until we reach port," said Edge. "If the facilities are available, the pucks are then recycled." Oily wastes, as well as other hazardous materials, are strictly monitored and accounted for to prevent contaminating the environment. The Navy and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provide waste management guidelines and instructions for the crew to follow, and the ship provides its own instruction on the use of hazardous materials.

Apart from waste disposal, the ship purifies salt water into potable water for the crew, which in turn reduces the use of natural freshwater. It takes energy to create potable water, and the crew is encouraged to limit their usage and conserve when possible, said Edge.

"Nuclear aircraft carriers and submarines use very little fuel, but as a destroyer we rely on fuel. We attempt to limit our usage as much as possible, but it is dependent upon the mission," said Edge. "We want to leave the ocean the same way we found it, in order to do that we have to raise awareness."

James E. Williams minimizes their discharge of waste into the ocean as much as possible. "It's important for our future and for our children's future," said Hoskins. "It's our planet, and we've only got one of them."

James E. Williams
is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120428-15 - Release Date: 4/28/2012 2:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, USS James E. Williams Public Affairs, ARABIAN GULF (NNS)).

 

Porter Sailors Celebrate the Environment

 

“Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) celebrated Earth Day 2012 while deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) on 22 April 2012.

The ship hosted an Earth Day barbecue that offered Sailors a chance to relax, while reflecting on the ship's environmental conservation efforts.

"It was great to take a little time out of our busy operational schedule to relax and enjoy some good food with shipmates," said Culinary Specialist Seaman Daniel R. Mckee. "Everyone is aware that the next four days are dedicated to our Earth and what we can do to lower our impact on it."

Porter constantly works to minimize its environmental footprint.

Porter's
oily waste system is Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified and ensures residual oily liquids are kept aboard for reuse or proper disposal on shore.

As with all U.S. Navy ships,
Porter also takes proactive steps to ensure that solid waste created aboard is controlled and disposed of in an environmentally-responsible manner.

"We take all of our trash and dispose of it in accordance with Navy environmental protection guidelines," said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Michael Patino, one of the ship's waste-processing facility operators. "This means that all plastic is melted and compressed into disks that are offloaded upon returning to port; all metal is disposed of correctly; and all paper and food are ground up and reintroduced into the ocean ecosystem."

During the Earth Day barbecue,
Porter Commanding Officer Cmdr. Martin F. Arriola addressed the crew and urged them to remain vigilant in their environmental stewardship.

"Today's events offered us an opportunity to relax a little, but we must also remember that Earth Day is an important day for everyone around the world, whether you are in the military on deployment, or back at home, or if you are a civilian," said Arriola. "Our goal should be to leave our planet in as good a condition as possible for future generations to enjoy. Team Porter will continue to do our part as responsible environmental stewards."

Porter is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120428-12 - Release Date: 4/28/2012 8:36:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, GULF OF ADEN (NNS)).

 

Enterprise Working to Protect Environment

 

“Sailors and Marines assigned to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) observed Earth Day on 22 April 2012. Throughout the year, Enterprise does its part to protect the environment through daily practices that minimize the ship's environmental impact without affecting mission readiness. Sailors aboard Enterprise work with materials potentially harmful to the environment, known as hazardous material (HAZMAT), which needs to be disposed of in a safe manner, with minimal or no effect on the environment.

"Plastics, paints and solvents are the most common materials we have aboard that are harmful to the environment," said Chief Logistics Specialist Donald B. Jones, leading chief petty officer of the HAZMAT division. "These materials are saved until we get back to shore, where they can be recycled or disposed of at the proper shore facility."

Oily waste generated aboard
Enterprise is disposed of in the same manner. Enterprise's system ensures that residual engineering oily liquids are reused or disposed of properly by shore facilities when the ship returns to homeport. Enterprise crewmembers also separate their personal trash into three designated bags for sorting: paper, plastic and metal. In accordance with Navy environmental protection guidelines, all plastic is melted and compressed into disks that are offloaded upon returning to port, all metal is disposed of correctly, paper is incinerated, and food is ground up and reintroduced into the ecosystem.

"Separating trash is a part of what we do every day on
Enterprise to stay environmentally friendly," said Jones. "Any type of plastic has to be melted down and carried ashore. Good environmental stewardship is an all-hands effort and it starts in the work centers. Every Sailor and Marine does their part to ensure that materials are disposed of correctly."

Since 2009, the Navy has participated in the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force, led by the White House Council on Environmental Quality. The task force develops national policy that protects oceans, lakes and coastal areas.

Although Earth Day is officially observed on 22 April 2012,
Enterprise will celebrate Earth "Day" the entire month of April. "Partnering for a Greener Future," is the Navy's week-long Earth-themed program, concentrating on partnering with other military, government and civilian organizations to protect the environment and to provide alternate energy solutions.

The entire crew of
Enterprise is striving to work as a cohesive unit to be good stewards of the ocean. "Every crew member needs to realize that we have to work together to make a difference," said Jones.

Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and Operation Enduring Freedom missions” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120427-05 - Release Date: 4/27/2012 10:18:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Sailors aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) man a receiving station during a replenishment-at-sea with Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6).

 

120423-N-PK218-014 - ARABIAN GULF (April 23, 2012) - Sailors aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (C-69) man a receiving station during a replenishment-at-sea with Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE-6). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and Operation Enduring Freedom missions. Supply is assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 53 providing fuel and supplies to U.S. Navy and coalition ships in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott/Released)

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 16 to 23 April 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port of call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates on 24 April 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 24 to 27 April 2012 and then entered the Persian Gulf en route to the North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed from the Persian Gulf, transiting the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman between 27 and 28 April 2012, entering the North Arabian Sea on 28 April 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise, CVW-1 Support Operation Enduring Freedom

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 began flying combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) on 1 May 2012. Through these missions, the Navy and Marine Corps squadrons aboard Enterprise are providing direct support to coalition forces on the ground in Afghanistan. The missions include close-air support, electronic warfare, reconnaissance, and airborne command and control. In Afghanistan, these missions degrade terrorist activities, diminish Taliban influence and improve security, which leads to stability and economic prosperity.

CVW-1 spent months preparing for these missions, and is ready to join coalition forces in the region. Enterprise joins the USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group in the region. Thus far, Abraham Lincoln has flown more than 1,400 sorties, totaling more than 8,700 flight hours in support of coalition efforts in Afghanistan, according to the Lincoln's Public Affairs Office.

Over the course of May 1, their first day supporting
OEF, CVW-1 aircraft flew 29 sorties. According to Capt. Jeffrey Trent, commander, CVW-1, the number of sorties flown on the first day will be the standard throughout much of the time CVW-1 is supporting OEF. "That will be a very standard number," said Trent. "This is a marathon. We're going to be here for a number of months, and we're in it for the long haul, and getting jets on and off the deck is no easy task."

Accomplishing this task falls on the shoulders of the Sailors and Marines working aboard
Enterprise every day. "It's not just the airplanes flying. It's the Sailors and Marines working on the flight deck; it's the men and women working in the engineering plant, and those working everywhere in between, that support this mission," said Trent.

Enterprise should fly approximately 170 OEF sorties per week. Commander U.S. 5th Fleet reported U.S. Navy aircraft have averaged about 5,000 close-air support missions per year in support of OEF, since 2009. As they did in 2011, Enterprise and CVW-1 will directly contribute to that total in 2012. During last year's deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, Enterprise and CVW-1 supported OEF with a total of 1,450 combat sorties.

"During this deployment we get to capitalize on all the experience gained last year," said Trent. "However, training is happening every flight and every event improves overall readiness." Enterprise and CVW-1 will not be the only Navy assets supporting operations in Afghanistan during the carrier's final deployment. Sailors serve throughout all 34 Afghan provinces and in the six Navy-led Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs), promoting governance, enhancing security and aiding in reconstruction efforts.

CVW-1 is comprised of the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11, the "Checkmates" of VFA 211, the "Knighthawks" of VFA 136, the "Thunderbolts" of Marine Attack Fighter Squadron (VMFA) 251, the "Rooks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137, the "Screwtops" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 123, and the "Dragonslayers" of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11.

Enterprise is deployed on its final deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, conducting Maritime Security Operations efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120506-08 - Release Date: 5/6/2012 11:59:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Steve Smith, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

A helicopter conducts a vertical replenishment-at-sea.

 

120510-N-PK218-101 - ARABIAN SEA (May 10, 2012) - An SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11 conducts a vertical replenishment-at-sea with guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69). Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott/Released)

 

Big E” Steps It Up with Step Afrika!

 

“Step Afrika!, the world's first professional dance company dedicated to the tradition of stepping, visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) during the carrier's final deployment, on 11 May 2012. Step Afrika! performed for the crew and promoted an understanding of, and appreciation for, stepping, a type of dance during which the body is used as an instrument to create intricate rhythms and sounds through a combination of footsteps, claps and the spoken word.

While aboard, members of Step Afrika! toured the ship, ate meals with the crew, and met with Sailors during a step workshop and lecture, all before ending the evening with an inspiring hangar bay performance. "This is our first time aboard an aircraft carrier and we are extremely excited," said Jakari Sherman, the artistic director of the Step Afrika! dance company. "Upon arriving and stepping onto the flight deck, I got this sense of pride and community. Everyone was so unified under one goal." The unity displayed by the Sailors and Marines aboard Enterprise in their day-to-day lives is a concept familiar to the members of Step Afrika!.

 

It was the search for a unified purpose that inspired the creation of the dancing tradition now referred to as stepping. According to Sherman, stepping was created by African American college students who were members of fraternities and sororities. "It was a way for college students to escape the prejudices that they may have been going through at that time. So they joined these organizations to give themselves a common goal and purpose...to support each other on campus," said Sherman. Through their performance, Step Afrika! was able to introduce the crew of Enterprise to the art form they love, one with which many Sailors and Marines were unfamiliar.

"A lot of the crew has never been exposed to this form of expression and type of dance before," said Chief Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Courtney Kitrell. "Being in the Navy, we come from everywhere. So many categories of people, environments and religions...it's a rainbow of people. Learning about other people's culture makes you a more well-rounded Sailor." While the performance was meant to entertain and energize the crew, it also served another purpose. "The Navy is diverse, [it's made up of] people from different backgrounds, religions, nationalities and countries," said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Tabitha Gentry. "Events like this help Sailors broaden their horizons by experiencing different cultures."

Those in attendance to enjoy the show and learn about stepping were called upon by the members of Step Afrika! to show their appreciation for the performance through participation and excitement. "The energy of the audience is so important during the show, it is the show," said Sherman. "We give 110 percent every time we step on stage. The more energy the audience gives to us is more we can give back to them. Our show is very interactive. We encourage the audience to make noise, cheer and clap." The performance concluded with clapping and cheering from the crew who attended. The dance company then thanked the crew and expressed their appreciation for being able to perform aboard one of the Navy's most legendary ships. "It's a great opportunity to be on this ship performing and doing the things we are doing," said Sherman.

 

"If we made someone's day a little better, or if we gave someone a little flavor from home, then I feel like we have done our job. I hope that people not only enjoyed the show but that they have something they can take with them during the rest of deployment or even the next week or two. If they can ride the energy from our performance to help them do their job with a little bit more energy, then we did our job." After departing Enterprise, Step Afrika! will visit guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) before returning home to the United States” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120512-01 - Release Date: 5/12/2012 12:40:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry Andrew D. Gordon, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619